Voices of the Tongass - Torin Lehmann

This week on Voices of the Tongass we get to hear from Sitka native Torin Lehmann. To hear the show, scroll to the play bar at the bottom of this post. To read about the challenges of remote life, and why Torin feels lucky to be facing them, read on.

Photo By Berett Wilber

Torin Lehman is 23 years old and has the best commute in the Western Hemisphere. Maybe even in the world. It helps that the only way to get to work is by float plane. "We take off and we start heading south, fly over Camp Coogan. If it's really cloudy sometimes we'll have to fly all the way around the tip of the island, around Chatham. But if it's a sunny day we can fly directly over the island. When you get up there it's just mountains as far as the eye can see. Sometimes we'll fly closer to see if we can spot any goats or bear or deer, and on the approach into Deer Lake you can see the cabin and an awesome natural log jam at the mouth of the lake." Torin is a seasonal fisheries technician for NSRAA, and we managed to catch him for an interview on one of his rare days off in town. He works at a remote release station for coho salmon at Deer Lake, on the eastern side of Baranof Island. His job entails raising a stock of 2.8 million coho salmon until they're big enough to be released into the ocean, which is an eleven month process.

When he's not feeding millions of coho fry, Torin still has to find ways to stay busy. Fortunately, growing up in the Tongass has given him a lot of practice at creative entertainment. "I remember being six, seven years old and running around in the woods pretending I was a knight or a soldier. You're given this stretch of land and you kind of build a story for yourself to interact with, you go out and use your imagination to build upon that." Torin thinks that the place he grew up and the amount of time he's gotten to spend outdoors contribute to the creativity he now has when it comes to life in the Togass. "I think growing up here encourages you to go out and explore and use your imagination and be creative with your surroundings. Down south, one of the things I noticed, at least with the friends I made, was that the things to do were to go to the mall or play video games." Experiencing life "down south" reminds Torin how lucky he feels to be from Alaska. "How many other kids got to go whale watching from the minute they were born til now?...It teaches you not to take things for granted because there are millions of people who don't get to enjoy the things we do here."

Even with a lake full of tiny fish to keep him company, and no matter how creative he gets, Torin is out for weeks at a time. It can feel isolating. It's hard to see his friends and family in Sitka, let alone maintain the connections with people he knows outside of the state. For people who live in the Lower 48, this might not seem like a big deal, but for many young Alaskans, it's a major challenge. If you grow up in a small town, you know that maintaining good relationships with people you care about can have a huge impact on your happiness. "You know, I went to school in Maryland," Torin says, "And trying to keep in touch with people from back thereā€¦" he trails off and shakes his head. "You have to work at it. On the East or West coasts, if you haven't seen a friend in a while, you can just hop in your car. Here, if you want to see someone you went to school with, you have to buy a [plane] ticket, and figure dates out." For young people in Alaska just entering the job market, it makes trying to find a balance between their relationships and the place they live both frustrating and expensive.

Despite the challenges of rural life, Torin still has a great attitude. His approach to staying positive is close to the hearts of Sitkans of every generation: "Living in Sitka, you have to enjoy the rain, that's for sure. But it definitely makes the sunny days that much better," he says. As we all know, Sitka has had a particularly sunny summer, and the night of Torin's interview is beautiful. "I'll probably go to the gym for a little bit after this, go on a hike with the dogs," he says with a smile. "Have a beer. Watch the sunset." After all, it is his weekend.

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