Voices of the Tongass - Margot O'Connell

This week on Voices of the Tongass, Margot O'Connell gives us a look into the unique set of skills she has developed by growing up in the Tongass. To hear Margot's story, scroll to the play bar at the bottom of this post.

Margot O'Connell spends quality time with marine debris. Photo by Berett Wilber.

When we ask Margot O'Connell about her plans for the future, she tells us something we already know - something everyone who knows Margot knows about her: she loves books. "Growing up, books were sort of my entire universe," she says, "and that's still a big part of my life. I want to be a librarian. I'm going to go to grad school in a few years, I want to work in a library." Honestly, we are inspired by her sense of direction and her long term goals. But when we ask Margot about what she's doing now, she laughs out loud. "Well, growing up in Sitka you develop a weird skill set, so since 2008 I've been organizing and developing marine debris clean up on the outer coasts around Sitka. So kind of on accident I've become the marine debris coordinator for Sitka."

So library school is waiting because after graduation Margot felt "a compulsion to come home." And although Margot is humble, it's no accident that she has found herself involved with marine debris. She's been helping with the program for the last six years, and is now in charge of everything from organizing clean-ups and estimating fuel costs to partnering with community art programs and applying for grants. Not to mention the actual business of going out on the F/V Cherokee for a week at time to record what they can find on the beach. "We can only get on the beach June - September because of the weather. We'll take the Cherokee in, then a skiff, then a zodiac. We'll see what's there. We've expanded our mission to include tsunami tracking. So we'll record what we find, including invasive species. And then we'll actually remove all of the debris that we find on the beach."

Margot has never thought of herself as a scientist, but part of marine debris involves picking up shifts at the Sitka Sound Science Center, and teaching visitors about the local aquarium. She's surprised by how much she does know, even if it didn't come to her out of a book. Margot says she's learned through osmosis simply from growing up in Southeast. "The touch tanks we have [at the aquarium], they look like the tide pools we grew up playing in," she says. "Growing up here you just have this deep ingrained, inherited knowledge about the landscape and the environment." It's knowledge that she has put to use through her position with the marine debris program. Since she started in 2008, the program has cleaned more than 70,000 pounds of refuse off the beaches of Southeast Alaska.

The program will miss her when she follows her passion for history and books to librarian school, but Margot is pretty sure she'll be back. "I guess I always had two separate worlds," she says. "I loved where I was living, loved my school, but I really like to be in this environment. I love to come home."


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