Voices of the Tongass - Kevin McGowan

This week on Voices of The Tongass, Kevin McGowan explains his unusual fishing method: spear gun. To hear this week's show, scroll to the bottom of this post. To continue the story, keep reading.

Unintimidated by marine mammal or photographers. Photo by Berett Wilber.

Kevin McGowan has made some friends you need a snorkel to find. "Swimming and seeing a sea lion can be pretty terrifying. Usually they're just curious... but they're pretty terrifying looking creatures, so it can be unnerving. You see their huge brown bodies and their vicious looking faces. it's usually just a dark spot swimming under you, and then they pop up and you know they're there. And hopefully they don't do too much damage to you."

Born and raised in Southeast Alaska, at age 21, Kevin knows that the experiences he had (and marine mammals he met) growing up have uniquely shaped him. "My interests are environment based," he says. "My whole life has revolved around water." And when he moved away from Sitka for college, he found it very difficult to translate those interests into a different environment. "My friends didn't get to see that side of me," he says. He's certainly not the only one - while leaving home for college is difficult for all kinds of reasons, for the kids of Southeast Alaska, it is often harder to leave the wilderness environment behind more than their houses and neighborhoods. When the environment is a major component of your activities and interests, it also factors into your relationships with the people around you. In a new geographic environment, kids from Southeast not only have to deal with the usual homesickness, but they have to find a new way to make friends and navigate relationships without access to the things they usually do with their friends. "It would be hard [for my school friends] to see all my real interests, because a lot of them are really location based, the snorkeling and the mountain climbing and boating and kayaking," Kevin says. "That's all dependent on things I have here, and going to school I don't have access to all these things. The way I relate to people from Sitka is a deeper connection. [I] don't necessarily have that with people at school."

But luckily, growing up outdoors doesn't just serve to hinder the social experiences of Southeast Alaskan kids who are trying to make it in more urban and academic environments: Kevin also gives it credit for some of his success. For a guy who admits his high school years were spent dreaming about being outdoors, Kevin says his attitude towards school has shifted. "I definitely have focused academically," he says. After a hard first year at OSU, he transferred to UAF, and took classes which he needed to catapult him to engineering school in California. Three schools in three years would wear out even the most dedicated student: so how did the shift from dreaming about getting out of the classroom to doggedly trying to stay in it occur? He sees his motivation linked to his experiences growing up in Alaska. "There's a lot of curiosity that I've developed growing up here, adventures and finding new things," he says. "So with school, I want to learn a lot of new things. It's helped myself apply myself to schoolwork. Because there's new things to learn. New people to meet, more foods to try. You don't necessarily need to be snorkeling to experience somewhere cool and new." And even though there will be challenges to surmount, it's hard not to have faith in his ability to succeed. If he can make a good impression underwater on a sea lion underwater, it's hard to imagine him feeling out of his depth.

Want to listen to Kevin's stories about spearfishing in his own words? http://archive.sitkawild.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/13_LWL_KEVIN_MCGOWAN.wav


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