Voices of the Tongass - Jonathan Kreiss-Tomkins

To hear this week's episode of Voices of the Tongass, featuring Jonny KT, scroll to the bottom of this post.


Photo by Berett Wilber

It has stopped raining by the time Jonathan Kreiss-Tomkins gets off the plane, but his feet are already wet. Why? "Oh, I ran from Craig to Klawock this morning," he says casually.

This is perhaps the best introduction to Jonathan that you could get. Born and raised in Sitka, Alaska, most of the people that know Johnny would say that he has always been unusually active. "In the beginning of high school I would start to go off on trips in the mountains in Baranof just by myself. I would pack my backpack and go off and explore," he says. One of those trips? An attempt to trace the Kiksadi Survival March throughthe backcountry, from the northern tip of Baranof Island to the town of Sitka. "It rained every day and it was wonderful. I think about that trip all the time," Johnny says. And when he tries to explain why, he gets down to the heart of something that many Alaskans can relate to. "We're made to go from place to place, inherently nomadic in some way. When you complete a trip from A to B, it sounds so simple: why would you waste your time putting yourself through brush and discomfort? But it satisfies a very primal purpose, moving and accomplishing something in a locomotive way."

The mountainous landscape of our archipelago has given Jonathan vast areas in which to satisfy the need to be active, and the landscape has become part of who he is. As a result, a relationship to place has become very important to him. "You want to fall in love with the place you live," he says, comparing place to a life partner, "that is the same kind of relationship." He feels his deep connection to place is unusual, and it keeps him coming back to Sitka, even if it's hard to describe why. "Something I realized back East [at college] was that some of my classmates weren't in love with a place. Perhaps it's self-perpetuating, in that if you're in a place where other people are committed to place, that sense of community perpetuates itself."

We ask Johnny why he thinks people here become committed to place, and he responds, "Sitka is objectively breathtaking in its place in the natural world - mountains, the ocean, the outer coast, that's the reason tourists come here, and it's hard not to appreciate that. But it's a difficult, perhaps unanswerable, philosophical question.That's like asking why people fall in love - with a person, or with a place? I don't know why. In some ways it's just innate to us."


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