Voices of the Tongass - Hannah Hamberg

For many Alaskans, the West Coast and the East Coast seem worlds apart. But Hannah Hamberg, who splits her time between rainy Southeast Alaska and upstate New York, has learned that you don't have to choose between coasts - you just have to be able to find the connections between them. To hear Hannah's story in her own words, click the link at the bottom of the page. To read more, just scroll down.

Hannah Hamberg and her best friend Scout. Photo by Berett Wilber

Hannah Hamberg is wearing red lipstick and a very crisp white eyelet jacket. She looks as if she could have just popped in from a New York City street, the place where she likes to spend weekends with her friends when she's at school upstate, where she studies graphic design. As she's talking to us, her dad comes downstairs and laughs. "It doesn't look like you could be the person who you're talking about," he says and Hannah laughs.

Because of course, we're not in New York. We're sitting at her dining room table, in her large and spacious kitchen, looking out the big windows at the towering forest of Southeast Alaska. And even if Hannah can navigate city streets like a native, the story she's telling us is about running from a grizzly bear. "We were just across the way from my house, clam digging. We got out on the beach, and walked down about ten feet. We were about to start digging clams. And then we looked up - and saw a sow with two cubs. And she got up on her hind legs and started growling at us. We ran back to the boat. You're not supposed to run, but the boat seemed so close." She laughs. "We left the shovel behind."

Hannah is a refreshing change from some of the frustrating stereotypes of what it means to grow up in Alaska, and the vague pressure to "seem outdoorsy." Hannah can put on xtratufs and carrying a gun up a mountain, but she also sees her childhood in the wilderness as a resource in a more subtle way. "I'm not conscious of the way it affects me, but it has to in some way. It gives me a different perspective because I didn't grow up in New York City. I have a point of view that isn't as influenced. I feel like it kind of helped me create my own point of view rather than being influenced by outside perspectives."

And they are some fairly towering perspectives. "I've spent a lot of time on float planes," she says. "We have a cabin in Prince of Wales and we always used to take the float plane down. It's a surreal experience to be flying in between peaks and look down and see a mountain goat. Or feel the downdraft coming between the mountains, and getting physically pushed down by the wind." So what does Hannah plan to do with the unique perspective she is cultivating, whether that's by hunting with her dad or taking classes at the Rhode Island School of Design?

"There's this magnetizing effect that Sitka has," she says. "I always want to come back. For my job, I'll probably have to start in the city - NYC, or San Fran. But my goal is to come back to Sitka, and to do design out of Sitka, for this area. It's home, you know. It's home."

To hear Hannah's story, click here:15_LWL_HANNAH_HAMBERG

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