Sitka Conservation Society
Nov 06 2012

Tongass-Inspired Costumes for Halloween 2012

For Halloween this year, we asked the Sitka community to look at the Tongass, consider what they love about it, and use Halloween as a way to express the beautiful national forest that surrounds us by wearing Tongass-inspired costumes.

Clicking through the photos below, one can see the diverse ways kids represented the Tongass. Whether it be by dressing up as a Tongass critter, a float plane, or a fishermen, the Tongass supports the livelihoods and maritime culture of Southeast Alaska while inspiring us in creative ways.


Thank you to Old Harbor Books, Harry Race Pharmacy, and the Chocolate Moose for providing goodies, as well as SCS staff members Erin, Tracy,  Courtney, and Andrew for handing out candy and smiling a whole bunch!



Sep 12 2012

Sea Lion Cove

Sitka Trail Works provides visitors and residents of Sitka with a series of well managed trail systems- offering outdoor enthusiasts the opportunity to travel at ease through some of the most beautiful and unique habitats on earth. The Sea Lion Cove hike, located on Kruzof Island, winds through an incredible diversity of habitats over a relatively short distance.

Beginning on a rocky shore, hikers scramble across rugged coast terrain stopping to admire bears grazing on distant estuaries. Next, the trail slips past a large forested lake before bending through a misty rainforest stand, streams and small waterfalls. For me, the overwhelming beauty of these areas far surpassed the annoyance of the few slips, trips, and falls I took. Keep in mind however, the importance of wearing shoes with powerful grip when attempting any trail in the Southeast. When the wood planks that make up managed trail systems become wet they become incredibly slippery too. Pack a positive attitude with your rain gear, snacks, water, and camera!

The trail also brings hikers through muskeg, an incredibly unique and almost eerie wetland habitat found throughout Southeast Alaska, before culminating in Sea Lion Cove. The cove boasts a truly breathtaking view- an open sand beach nestled within forest and estuary beside a dramatic ridge line.  Littered with drift wood and brilliantly colored seaweeds and shells, hikers could spend hours combing the sand for treasures- pack a ziplock for collecting. Be sure to find a comfortably worn slab of driftwood to relax on and eat your packed lunch before hiking back.

All in all, if you are looking for a day hike that packs the most diversity for your effort, the Sea Lion Cove trail system is a must! Muskeg, mountains, forest, rushing streams, a lake, estuary and a sandy beach (coveted and rare to this area) Sea Lion Cove has it all. Although, finding transportation to Sitka’s brilliant neighbor -Kruzof Island- can sometimes be difficult for those of us without access to a skiff, Sitka Trail Works offers transportation and company once a year on a guided hike. A great way to meet new people with similar interests, enjoy a diversity of habitats, and bring home a few beauties for the beach combing collection, Sitka Trail Work’s guided Sea Lion Cove hike is a no-brainer.

Supporting organizations like Sitka Trail Works is a must for retaining recreation opportunities for a wide demographic. If one were to attempt to traverse the Sea Lion Cove route twenty years ago when the land was transferred from the US Forest Service to the state, they would have experienced impassable, eroded, boot-sucking mud pits through trampled muskeg ecosystems. Three years of hard work combined with private, foundation, and agency grant funds led to the restored beautiful plank trail system you can enjoy today.

Learn more about Sitka Trail Works, Sea Lion Cove, other trail systems, and review a schedule of guided hikes check out:

Sep 06 2012

I can feel Edgecumbe in my muscles

I can feel Edgecumbe in my muscles, and in certain parts of my feet and hips, I can feel the mountain in my bones. We planned this trip a week ago, and the sun agreed with a sky so blue and cloudless. A quarter to seven brought us to Crescent Harbor, and with a few safety instructions and tugs on our lifejacket straps, Alison and John Dunlap brought us to Fred’s Creek. The Dunlaps are the owners of Sitka Sound Ocean Adventures, and are long time Sitka residents who understood how fortunate we were to make it out to Mt. Edgecumbe on Sitka’s eighth day of summer.

Last time I was out here I saw a bear over there,” says John as the skiff settles into the sand with help from the incoming tide. We each jump out, confidently landing our hiking-boot-xtra-tuff feet on Kruzof not only as interns of Sitka Conservation Society, but as folks from Sitka and from down South—as folks in love with experiences that could only be labeled “Alaskan.” There were six of us—Ashley Bolwerk, Elizabeth Cockrel, Helen Schnoes, AJ Shule, Jonathan Goff, and myself—who chose water bottles, trail mixes, muskegs, forest patches, ups and downs, sun kissed skin, and deep inhales and exhales for our Tuesday. At times I was in front, feeling eager to reach the base in a couple hours, but we each took turns switching off who led, switching off who called water break, switching off who exclaimed “how beautiful is this.” Jonathan, an SCS botanist intern, would pause frequently to get closer looks at the plant life along the wood plank trails, at times even getting down on his knees to smell Deer Heart flowers and other blooms. Helen, one of SCS’s Sustainable Salmon Specialists, discovered her camera had a panoramic setting, and often one could see her body pivot in a circle as she tried to capture all of us within the wide landscape.

Thank you for waiting so patiently for us Edgecumbe,” I exclaimed as we got approached the rock steps at the base of the mountain.

Mountains take time.  Mountains take meditative foot placements, sweat and salt from your body, and critical thought, but they also give. Edgecumbe inspired us to give each other this experience, to give a potential to our bodies that our minds might typically resist.  I did not drink coffee that morning, or eat my lunch beforehand but something made me keep moving as I brought myself over those rock steps, immerging bright eyed to the sun hitting the red, powdered soil.

Mountains also give you the wisdom to not hold on to expectations. The bleached white posts that lined the minimal trail up Edgecumbe became my pacemakers, and in the beginning I would approach each post thinking I was almost to the top only to see six more in front of me, six beautiful yet spread out ribs of the earth. This pattern of me expecting the top to be there I soon learned to stop and instead I began to enjoy the gradual rise up. Enjoyment eased my mind, and allowed for a creative fire to develop from my muscles and mind. I began to visualize every post as a person I had deep feelings for, letting them take on the forms of my siblings, my parents, my sweet, sweet friends. I even visualized a post as myself, laughing briefly at what my former self would say if she could see me up there. To be honest, I even began hugging these tall markers and used them as I would with a dependable friend to glance back at Baranoff and the sea.

At the top, I kissed a rock I had found along the way and placed it in a pile started by other travelers who ritualized this experience. I carried my body on the flat earth to a spot that felt right, took off my pack, and gazed down into Edgecumbe’s naval, crescent-filled with white lint snow.  Sitting down felt exotic. Eating lunch felt indulgent. Really, to be sitting on top of a dormant volcano with my shoes and socks off on a sunny day in Southeast Alaska, overlooking forests, mountain ranges, ocean, and even seeing Sitka—this called for poetry, for odes, for screaming, and for all you yogis out there, this experience called for a happy baby. You cannot help but look and feel epic, you cannot help but feel your mind and body fused.

How do people seem pre Edgecumbe and post Edgecumbe?” I now ask Alison Dunlap.

Read more →

Sep 04 2012

Sitka, AK – Where Theory Meets Practice

In July of 2012, thirteen undergraduate students from Knox College embarked on a 15-day wilderness expedition into the wilds of Southeast Alaska’s Tongass National Forest.  The trip was part of a semester long course entitled “Alaska: Forest, Fisheries, and the Politics of Wilderness”.  The course entailed an in-depth study of the history of natural resource management in Southeast Alaska.  The first part of the course took place on the Knox College campus in Galesburg, IL with a thorough exploration of the literature regarding natural resource extraction in Southeast Alaska.  This classroom based study of Alaskan resource management was complimented with a 15-day field expedition to the region the following summer.  This was the “hands on” component to what they had learned in the classroom.

The students arrived in Sitka, Alaska on June 27th, 2012.  After a few days of preparation they embarked on a 100 mile kayaking expedition guided by Latitude Adventures, a local kayak guiding operation.  For many of these students, this was their first experience camping, not to mention their first experiences in the great Alaskan wilderness.  After ten days on the water, exploring the intertidal zone, watching bears, eagles, and whales; the students arrive at False Island on Chichagof Island.  There the students then spent five days working side by side with the United States Forest Service restoring salmon streams that had been degraded by industrial logging.  They also had the opportunity to participate in a variety of scientific surveys aimed at understanding the complexities of young growth forests.

This expedition was so unique because it allowed the students to experience the places that they had learned about in the classroom, first hand.  For many, this was a trip of a lifetime.

Opportunities like Knox College’s course are available for colleges and universities throughout the nation.  It is the goal of the Sitka Conservation Society and the Sitka Sound Science Center to connect courses like these with our local assets.  We can connect you and your students with our local experts, guides, interpreters, and organizations to facilitate your course’s Alaskan education.



Aug 29 2012

Cultivating Salmon, Cultivating Community

The hatchery employees at the Medvejie Hatchery located south of Sitka exemplify what it means to be “living with the land and building community in Southeast Alaska.” They are the living link between the community of Sitka and the robust salmon fishery that supports the community. Their good work helps sustain healthy wild runs of salmon and healthy Alaskan communities. Without hatcheries like Medvejie, the Alaskan salmon industry would not be what it is today.

By the 1970’s, the state’s wild stock of salmon had been severely damaged by overfishing.  In response to this crisis, the state developed a hatchery program intended to supplement, not supplant, the wild stocks of salmon.  For this reason, there is a litany of policies and regulations that guide the state’s hatcheries in order to protect the wild runs of salmon.

One of the policies developed to protect the wild runs of salmon was the mandated use of local brood stock. “Brood stock” are the fish a hatchery uses for breeding.  Requiring that the “brood stock” be “local” means that the fish used for breeding must be naturally occurring in the area versus fish from outside the region.  This requirement is designed to help maintain the natural genetic diversity of the run.

This August I had the opportunity to participate in Medvejie’s brood stock propogation of Chinook Salmon (i.e., King Salmon).  This involved the physical mixing of a male Chinook salmon’s sperm with a female’s row.  We were, quite literally, making salmon. 

However, it wasn’t just salmon that was being cultivated that day, but a resource to sustain the local community.  In recent years, Medvejie has had the most successful Chinook program in Southeast Alaska.  In the last ten years, the hatchery’s runs of Chinook have averaged 34,000 fish.  Most of these fish, an average of 9,500 over the last ten years, are harvested in May and June by Sitka’s commercial trolling fleet.  The sportfishing fleet benefits as well, reaping an average of nearly 1,950 fish in this same period.  While the associated economic impacts from these fish are beyond measure, it is safe to say that they are essential to the health of the local economy.

My experience taking brood stock at Medvejie taught me how fortunate we are to have such a well-managed fishery in the state of Alaska.  I also learned about the fragility of this resource. Without such strict policies regulating the fishing industry, we would not have a resource that provides so much for our community.  Salmon fishing is the cultural and economic backbone for many communities in Southeast Alaska.  In the future, we must remember this fact to protect the resource that makes the community whole.

Aug 22 2012

Restoring Salmon Habitat at Sitkoh Lake

Much has changed at Sitkoh Lake since the late 1970’s.  What was once an epicenter for industrial logging is now a center of activity for forest and watershed restoration.  During the summer of 2012, the Sitka District of the United States Forest Service (USFS) went into the Sitkoh Lake Watershed to restore tributary streams and repair some of the damage that was caused by industrial logging.  This logging occurred at a time when we didn’t understand the value of the yearly returns of salmon compared to the short-term gains of clear-cut logging.

In the late 1970’s the area around Sitkoh Lake was heavily logged and many roads were constructed in close proximity to the nearby streams.  Unfortunately, the resulting degradation in wildlife and stream habitat made survival more difficult for the area’s Sockeye, Coho, Pink, and Chum salmon.  To rectify this issue, the Sitka Ranger District of the USFS has invested resources to restore and monitor these important streams.

Rivers and streams in old growth forest naturally have large logs and other root masses that create ideal habitat for juvenile salmon that spend the first years of their lives in this slow moving, deep water.  These natural structures help to create deep pools, oxygenate the water, and provide cover from predators.  When the area around a stream is heavily logged, the natural material that can create this salmon habitat is lost.  As a result the stream becomes straighter, shallower and less ideal for juvenile salmon.

To fix this problem the crew from the US Forest Service installed a number of man-made structures called “upstream V’s” that replicate these natural structures.  These upstream V’s help channel the stream’s flow and create deeper, slower moving water ideal for juvenile salmon.  However, these are temporary fixes that will hold the stream bank together until the trees along the stream grow large enough to naturally create this habitat diversity for spawning salmon.

This project in the Sitkoh Lake Watershed is important because these salmon runs help support many of our local communities.  Many commercial seine and troll fishermen depend on these fish for their livelihoods.  These runs also support our local subsistence fishery that so many residents depend upon for their sustenance.  Considering these qualities, it’s fair to say that these streams are the lifeblood for the nearby communities of Angoon and Sitka.

Forest Service projects like this that “manage the Tongass for Salmon” are extremely important investments in both the ecosystems of the Tongass as well as the economy of Southeast Alaska.  But this project is just a start.  There are still hundreds of miles of salmon streams that have been impacted by historic clear-cut logging that still need restoration.

SCS is working to make sure that this project is only the beginning of a long-term focus of Tongass management that focuses on our Wild Alaska Salmon Resource.

Aug 17 2012

Sitka Black Tailed Deer in August

August is an amazing month for deer in Southeast Alaska.  During August, there is food for deer everyplace.  The estuaries have copious amounts of sedges and grasses; berry bushes are filled out with green leaves, blueberries, and Red-huckleberries; ground forbs are in full growth.  The vegetarian deer are literally wading through a full salad bowl of nutritious greens and tasty treats and can take a bite of of just about everything they pass and munch it down!

With all the plants available, the deer can afford to be choosey about where they hang out and what they eat.  Obviously, they pick the best place to go:  the high alpine.   In the high alpine they find the newest and most nutritious growth.  This summer, after a heavy winter, there are many patches of alpine where the snow has only recently melted and new grass and deer cabbage is just starting to grow and begin to blossom.  These new shoots are tender and the deer graze hard on these to fatten up to get through the leaner winter months.

Deer also like the high alpine because they have both the cover of the stunted mountain hemlock trees as well as long vistas to keep a lookout on what is around then.  There is often a breeze in the alpine and on the ridges that helps the deer keep the bugs from biting.   I’m not sure if this is a factor or not for the deer, but the high alpine of the outer coast is also amazingly beautiful and has some of the most spectacular views in the entire world!

Sitka Black Tailed Deer are an amazing creature of the temperate rainforests.  They are one of the most treasured species in Southeast Alaska.  The work of SCS to protect the forest habitat of the deer and conserve intact watersheds ensures the long-term conservation of this amazing creature.


Aug 14 2012

A Guide to Canning Salmon

Have you ever wanted to can salmon but haven’t been able to find good instructions?

Brian Hamilton, a local fisherman and connoisseur of wild foods, is here to help.  He has put together a very detailed explanation of the process he goes through when catching, cleaning, brining, smoking, and canning salmon.

My hope is that these instructions help others in their quest to preserve some of our local delicacies.

Here are Brian’s instructions:

“A Brief Outline of Catching, Cleaning, Brining, Smoking, and Canning Salmon.


  1. Once fish is caught (and killed), cut or remove gills to allow blood to drain from fish.
  2. Keep fish cold. ( I run a stringer through their gill flap and tie them to a rock making sure their bodies stay submerged in water).
  3. Once fish are caught, clean them as soon as possible.

* Try not to let fish get discolored which usually results from letting them sit to warm and too long before cleaning.

Cleaning:  (this is done easily in a double sink with a large counter space next to it)

  1. Rinse each fish in cold water removing any large external debris.
  2. Place fish on counter.  Hold tail with non-dominant hand and use a sharp fillet knife to cut a shallow incision from the anus to the fish’s bottom lip.
  3. Gently remove all organs from stomach cavity, being careful not to rupture the intestines or rectum (they contain green waste that spreads quickly and could damage the quality of the fish meat).
  4. Use the tip of the fillet knife to cut open the thin membrane that covers the spinal fluid. (Spinal fluid resembles thick, coagulated blood).
  5.  Rinse out spine and stomach cavities thoroughly with cold water.
  6. Cut two spine deep slits on each side of fish: 1 behind the gills and the other just in front of the tail
  7. Cut fillets off each side (I hold the tail with my non-dominant hand and run the fillet knife from tail slit to gill slit, keeping knife lightly pressed against the spine.  Try to remove as much meat as possible.  Bones are ok.)
  8. Cut fillets in half and rinse thoroughly.  Dry scale side down with a paper towel, removing as much slime as possible.
  9. Place fillet halves into brine (see recipe) and discard fish carcasses. *

*For bear safety it is strongly recommended that the fish carcasses and organs are bagged and frozen then dumped in your street garbage the morning it is picked up.

Brining- water, sugar, salt

  1. In 2 quarts cold water, add just enough salt to float and uncooked egg and then thoroughly mix.
  2. Then add 2 cups brown sugar and thoroughly mix again.
  3. Add fish and let fish sit in fridge for 12 hours.

Smoking- (plug in smoker 30 minutes before smoking)

  1. After fish has set in brine for 12 hours, remove from brine and thoroughly rinse.  Set rinsed fillets, scales down, on clean smoker racks (leaving about 1 inch between fillets helps smoke rise).
  2. Pat fillets with paper towels and then let them sit for 30 min in a cold, dry, clean place.
  3. Load fillets into smoker, starting with the top rack.
  4. Fill the wood chip pan with wood chips.
  5. After about 2.5 hours, check wood chip pan.  DO NOT REMOVE THE ENTIRE FRONT COVER.  If chips are exhausted, discard and refill wood chip pan.
  6. After another 2.5 hours, unplug smoker.


Supplies- Mason jars w/ lids and rings, pressure cooker.

  1. Thoroughly wash and rinse mason jars, rings, and lids and set them out to dry.  (It takes about 1 jar per 2 fillet halves, but have extras just in case).
  2. Remove lowest tray of smoked salmon fillets from smoker and set on counter.
  3. Remove as much skin as possible from each fillet, then pack fish into jars.  Bones are okay!
  4. Fish can be lightly stuffed into jars but make sure there is at least 1 inch of empty space between top lip of jar and the highest point of fish in jar.
  5. Place seal lid and ring onto each jar and lightly tighten each ring.  Rings should just barely “catch” before you stop tightening.  This will allow heat to escape jars during pressure cooking.
  6. Place jars into pressure cooker and stack if your pressure cooker is large enough.  Make sure a rack is in place (included with pressure cooker) so jars aren’t sitting directly on the bottom of the cooker.
  7. Fit as many jars as possible in the pressure cooker.
  8. Follow instruction manual for pressure cooker for amount of water and vinegar to add.
  9. Run a paper towel along the top rim of the jar to thoroughly clean off any debris.
  10. Place lid on pressure cooker and latch close, heat escape vent should be open and/or uncovered.
  11. Put pressure cooker on a stove and heat on highest setting.
  12. Once water boils, steam will emit from the heat vent.  Once steam is emitted in a strong, steady stream place cover on heat vent.  Once pressure builds up, the pressure stop will rattle around and eventually pop up.
  13. Pressure will slowly build on the pressure gauge.  Once 11 psi is reached, turn down heat setting and try not to allow pressure to exceed 11 PSI.
  14. Start a timer for 100 minutes and constantly adjust stove heat up and down to keep pressure at 11PSI.
  15. After 100 minutes, turn off stove heat and move pressure cooker to a non-heated stove surface.  Pressure will slowly decrease.
  16. After about 30 minutes, pressure will reach zero and the pressure stop will drop, carefully remove lid from canner making sure to keep the steam away from your face and arms.
  17. Jars are extremely hot.  Using hot gloves or a folded towel, remove each jar slowly and place on a towel or heat resistant surface.  The fat from the fish will be built up in the jars and still boiling.  Some jars may be broken, so carefully remove those jars from the bottom with a metal spatula or similar tool.  (As long as shards of glass are not present and jar breakage looks clean, the fish should be safe to consume.)  Leave jars to cool for a couple of hours at room temperature.
  18. As jars cool, the lids will compress and seal with popping sounds, which completes the sealing of the jar.  If any jar is cooled and not sealed, they are not safe for storage and should be refrigerated and consumed soon.  Sealed jars are usually safe at room temperature for at least a year or two.
  19. Store jars in a cool, dry place.
  20. Eat often.
Aug 09 2012

Climbing Mt. Edgecumbe


This has got to be one of the coolest hikes I’ve ever done!  This last July I was able to participate in the Sitka Trail Works Mt. Edgecumbe hike (i.e., climbing our local volcano).  The trip began with a boat ride across Sitka Sound to the trailhead at Fred’s Creek Cabin.  After unloading and organizing our packs we began our 7 mile and nearly 3,000 vertical feet climb up the mountain (and that’s just one way!).

The first part of the trail winds through a giant stand of old growth hemlock and spruce.  After a few minutes zigzagging through the trees we broke out into the open muskegs where the majority of the trail is located.  The muskegs of Kruzof Island are a truly amazing site as they are some of the biggest in the area, stretching across most of the island.

After roughly 4 miles of fairly flat terrain, we arrived at the three-sided shelter.  There we found a number of other trip participants resting and nourishing themselves for the climb to the top of the volcano.  From the three-sided shelter to the top of the volcano it is roughly 3 miles and nearly 2,000 vertical feet.  It’s by far the hardest part of the hike, but also the most rewarding.

About two miles from the three-sided shelter we broke through the treeline.  At that point the trail dissipates and we were left with an assortment of cedar posts stuck in the ground as trail guides.  At first glance the cedar posts marking the trail seemed a bit overkill, however, when the fog rolled in we were happy to have them.

From the tree line we climbed for about twenty minutes completely engulfed in a thick layer of fog.  Just as we began to crest the rim of the volcano, the clouds broke and we could see where we had wandered.  Below us lay the muskegs of Kruzof Island and its rocky outer coast.  To our east and south we could see the peaks of Baranof Island and the small speckles of civilization in Sitka.  At that moment, we couldn’t think of anywhere else we’d rather be.

Aug 09 2012

Saint Lazaria



We sat quietly in the colony struggling not to make noise for fear of scaring the birds.  It was about ten o’clock at night and the sun was still setting.  To the west the sun sank over the horizon and the last few flickers of light colored the approaching clouds.  To our east and south the full moon rose in a brilliant orange, promising to illuminate our night’s work. The scene was dreamlike, surreal.

Part of what makes Saint Lazaria so unique is its somewhat unusual land use designation.  The island of Saint Lazaria is part of the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Homer, AK.  It is also a designated Wilderness Area protected under the National Wilderness Preservation System.  This multi-level protection has kept the island in pristine condition.

My work with SCS brought me to Saint Lazaria to learn about Alexis Will and the research she is conducting on the island.  Will is a graduate student at the University of Alaska Fairbanks where she is working towards her Masters’ of Science in Biology and Wildlife.  For her thesis she is trying to determine the diets and foraging grounds of Rhinocerous Auklets (i.e., Cerorhinca monocerata).  Will believes that by better understanding this species’ diet and foraging grounds, we will better understand how these birds may adapt to an increasingly variable environment.

Will’s research is also part of a bigger study.  In recent years the population of five key groundfish species in the Gulf of Alaska have been significantly lower than in previous years.  This is particularly alarming as these five fish species are all commercially important to the state.  To determine what is causing this decline, the North Pacific Research Board is currently in the process of conducting a Gulf of Alaska-wide study. Their goal is to better understand the causes for these declining populations.

So how does Will’s research fit in to this bigger project?

Here’s the thing.  Rhinocerous Auclets feed on the same fish that the five groundfish species feed on.  If Alexis can determine where and how much fish the Saint Lazaria Rhinocerous Auclets are eating, then we will have a better picture of the food base in the Gulf, at least, theoretically.  With better information on the health of the food base in the Gulf, the state of Alaska will have better science with which to base their fishing quotas.  It’s cool research and I was glad to have the opportunity to learn more about it.

However, what intrigued me most about Saint Lazaria was my experience in the Rhino colony.  The Rhinoceros Auklet colony is located at the edge of a very steep and menacing cliff.  Below the cliff we could see the commercial salmon fleet at anchor, protected in the lee of the island. As the Rhinos arrived at their nest to feed their chicks, the commercial trolling fleet sat below bracing for the approaching gale, and in the distance the lights of Sitka illuminated the night sky.  As I sat in the darkabsorbing the night’s activities, I was reminded of the simple fact that we are ALL part of this global ecosystem.

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  • Hungry for Huckleberry Pie, Venison Stew, or Fresh Greens? Come to the Wild Foods Potluck Nov. 2!
  • Stand Up to Corporate Influence!
  • Kayaking Kootznoowoo: Report on SCS’s Final Wilderness Trip
  • Encouraging Local Natural Resource Stewardship on the Tongass: Kennel Creek
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