Sitka Conservation Society
Sep 20 2014

Hungry for Huckleberry Pie, Venison Stew, or Fresh Greens? Come to the Wild Foods Potluck Nov. 2!

Do you have some extra huckleberries lying around? Or perhaps a bit of venison you’re not quite sure what to do with?
Well, we’ve got a solution for you: Prepare a dish for the Sitka Conservation Society’s Wild Foods Potluck!
What is the Wild Foods Potluck?
The Wild Foods Potluck is an annual event that celebrates the wild foods of Southeast Alaska. Each person or family is asked to bring a dish that incorporates a wild or local food. The event is hosted by the Sitka Conservation Society, an organization that has worked to protect Southeastern Alaska and the Tongass National Forest since 1967.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                When / where is it?
The Wild Foods Potluck will take place on Sunday, November 2 at Centennial Hall. Doors will open at 5 p.m. and we ask that people arrive no later than 5:30 p.m. with a dish to share.
                                                                                                                                                                                                              What should I bring to the potluck?
Bring a dish featuring food that was fished, foraged, picked, hunted, or cultivated in Southeast. If you don’t have any wild food to share, simply garnish your dish with some local flowers or garden plants. Prizes will be awarded for first place in the following categories: Best Entree, Best Side Dish, Best Dessert, Most Creative, and Best Kids Entry.
Here’s just a few examples of local and wild foods you can incorporate into a dish: wild berries, fish, cabbage, kale, bull kelp, beach asparagus, mushrooms….the possibilities are endless!

What else can I expect?
Food isn’t the only highlight of the evening. Members of the Sitka Conservation Society will share more information about the organization and its mission to protect the Tongass while supporting sustainable community development. Also expect to hear a bit about 4H and how the Sitka Conservation Society is working with young leaders to ensure the long-term sustainability of Sitka and the Tongass National Forest.
This is a family-friendly event open to the entire community. Join us for an evening filled with great food, company, and conversation.
Interested in volunteering at the potluck or want more information? Please contact Sophie Nethercut at or call 747-7509.
Sep 18 2014

Stand Up to Corporate Influence!

Sitkans hold a fake check made out to ConocoPhillips, BP, and Exxon at an SB 21 Rally on April 4, 2014.

This year’s primary election was one for the record books. Financial record books, that is. Over the last few months, Alaskans witnessed the most expensive primary campaign in state history. Where is all this money coming from? Corporations. And not just any corporations – some of the richest corporations on earth.

In order to secure their billion dollar tax break, oil companies contributed nearly $15 million to the Vote No (on Ballot Measure 1) campaign. According to campaign finance reports published by the state of Alaska, the top six contributors to the Vote No campaign were BP Exploration Alaska Inc. ($3,625,408), ExxonMobil ($3,606,132), ConocoPhillips Alaska ($2,541,584), ConocoPhillips ($1,471,077), Repsol ($729,432), and Chevron ($300,000). Less than 25 individual Alaskans contributed to the campaign. The Vote Yes campaign, on the other hand, received financial contributions from over 1,000 individual Alaskans.

The troubling statistics continue. Stockpiled with big oil money, the Vote No campaign spent $170 per vote. The Vote Yes campaign, which relied primarily on contributions from individual Alaskan donors, spent $8.

This is an example of corporations asserting undue influence in the political process. In a country that calls itself a democracy, corporations should never be allowed to pay their way into the political system. In Alaska, however, they are.

How do we stop corporations from dominating Alaska politics? We stand up to them. We use our individual and collective voices. We form coalitions and citizen movements that demand corporations to serve the public good, not the Gods of Profit.

Leading up to the primary election, the Sitka Conservation Society mobilized Alaskans across the state to take action on Ballot Measure 1. We made phone calls, knocked on doors, distributed lawn signs, and had meaningful conversations with community members about what’s at stake when corporations dominate our political system. Many Sitkans voiced their concerns about SB 21 via radio waves and newsprint. A giant thank you to Steve Paustian, Mary Beth Nelson, Cindy Litman, Libby Stortz, and Anthony Guevin for submitting Letters to the Editor about the importance of repealing the oil tax giveaway.

Our efforts paid off.  While the repeal failed statewide (52.5 percent of Alaskan voters voted No), Sitkans voted 3:1 in favor of the repeal. On Election day, some 1,315 Sitkans checked the “yes” box, compared to only 448 people who checked “no.” Every single precinct in the district voted in favor of the repeal.

What do these results reveal? They show us that we Alaskans are deeply divided on how we should manage our natural resources. They show us that thousands of Alaskans (90,150 to be exact) are willing to vote for oil company tax breaks, leaving less money for the state to fund public schools, hospitals, and necessary public services. But they also show us that thousands of Alaskans (nearly 82,000 voters) are deeply concerned about the excess role corporations play in the management of our natural resources.

The oil in our state ground belongs to the people of Alaska. We, the people of Alaska, must continue to mobilize against corporate oil giants that take our oil without investing in our state. Join us in our campaign to fight corporate influence and keep our natural resources in public hands.

To get involved or receive more information, email or call 907-747-7509.

Corporate spending in Alaska’s 2014 primary reached record levels. The Vote No campaign spent $170 per vote, compared to the Vote Yes campaign which spent $8.

Sep 08 2014

Teaching the Alaska way of Life: 4-H in Sitka

Mary Wood helps 4-H members get settled into their kayak before going on the water or the first time.

As the kids helped load the kayaks and safety equipment into the car, they complained the day’s activities had not been long enough.  Their grumbles continued in the van all the way back to town as they begged Alaska Way-of-Life 4-H leader, Mary Wood, for more time on the water the next day.  They only had one day left in their kayaking course, the last 4-H class of the summer, and they were not ready for it to end.

“They are developing a love and a passion for this place and that will have an impact on them,” Wood says about the Alaska Way-of-Life 4-H program.  From kayaking to gardening to fishing to cooking, her goal is to help the kids appreciate the beauty of their own backyard and grow up knowing they want to protect it.

“They will continue to be stewards of this place and be positive and productive members of their communities,” Wood says.  “Even if they leave, they will continue to advocate for the ideals they are learning in 4-H.”

The Alaska Way-of-Life 4-H program was started in Sitka three years ago with a push from Andrew Thoms, executive director of the Sitka Conservation Society.  Thoms knows that he came into conservation work because of his own experiences with 4-H growing up.

“I look back and it’s really amazing how much it shaped my life,” Thoms says.  Growing up in upstate New York, Thoms did 4-H projects centered around nature – enjoying bird watching, building bird houses, working on a Christmas tree farm, and learning about conservation.  “Through all of that, I got really into natural resources and natural resources management.”

Thoms came to Sitka 10 years ago and has been dedicated to building more community-driven programs here.  The 4-H program is just one part of that vision.

“We are helping to start 4-H, but for it to continue, it has to have people that are passionate and build the program themselves,” Thoms says.

Part of creating a sustainable community is teaching children to use and respect their environment.  Subsistence skills like harvesting berries, fishing, and hunting are all a part of life in Sitka, a community of about 9,000 in the heart of the Tongass National Forest.  Thoms wants kids to grow up learning how to best use their environment, respect it and protect it.  That’s the Alaska way of life.

But, 4-H can prepare kids for careers and opportunities outside of conservation also.  Alison Mazzon volunteered with the Alaksa Way-of-Life 4-H program this summer while she visited Sitka on a grant from Patagonia, the company she now works for.  While in Sitka, Mazzon helped chaperone the kayaking classes and taught classes on outdoor gear maintenance.

Mazzon grew up in Ohio and learned to sew at her local 4-H program.  From her first project of a pair of shorts to designing and making her own prom dresses, she gained more than just the ability to make to her own clothes and several state-level awards from her 12 years in 4-H.  Mazzon says she is grateful to 4-H for the friends she made and the leadership skills she gained.

And, like Thoms, Mazzon took her 4-H skills to her career.  After studying fashion design in college and working for a few years on the runways in New York City, Mazzon is currently a technical design manager for Patagonia and is part of the team that make high-performance outdoor clothing and gear.

“I don’t know what I would have done with my life otherwise,” she says.

Just a few short weeks after their kayaking adventures came to an end, the 4-H crew took to the beach and learned fishing skills as their first class of the new school year.

In addition to these classes, the kids will also do community service projects, an important aspect of building a sustainable community, Wood says. For example, the kids make jams and jellies for the senior center.  She says it teaches the kids a valuable skill and gives them a chance to connect with older generations.

One of Wood’s favorite memories of her time leading 4-H is from last year on Earth Day.  She had brought a group of students out to a local hiking trail to do some trash clean up.  She expected the kids to complain – spending a day picking up garbage not the ideal way to spend time for 9-year-olds.  But, the complaints she got were not what she expected.  They were upset that at how much trash they had collected.  How could so much litter be found in their home?

Going on her second year in Sitka, Wood has big plans for the 4-H program.  She is excited to start building a wider group of volunteers and seeing more kids join the program.  She also wants to develop more classes for high school students, as the majority if the activities over the last three years have been for ages 5 – 10.

Whether the kids are learning to make jams with the berries they picked for elders in the community or learning important outdoor skills for kayaking and hiking, the Alaska Way-of-Life 4-H program is about creating a strong community that exemplifies social, economic, and environmental sustainability.  Those Alaskan ideals, and the ideals of 4-H, are seen as intertwined for SCS and they last across generations.

“There is a big need for interdependence here,” Thoms says.  “In Alaska we are part of a community, and you cannot do it alone.”

To learn more about 4-H in Sitka and upcoming classes and events, email Mary Wood at

Sep 04 2014

Protecting America’s Last Frontier

Early last month, when the tailings dam at the Mount Polley Mine in British Columbia breached releasing 10 million cubic meters of contaminated water into Polley Lake and Quesnel Lake, southeast Alaskans woke up to the possibility that other BC mines could pose the same threats to southeast Alaskan fisheries.

Tailings dams are built to hold the waste rock that is extracted from ore during mining.  These toxic tailings are often stored under-water and the dams are built to keep the waste from spreading to the surrounding environment.  Because the waste rock can be so harmful, tailings dams need to be maintained forever.

The tailings dam at Mount Polley Mine was only 14 years old.

As more new mines are built along the BC and Alaska border, Alaskans now know the risks mining accidents pose to the people and ecosystems sitting downstream.  And they can do nothing to protect themselves.

The Transboundary Mine Issue

Mining has been a part of the British Columbia economy for more than 9,000 years, since First Nation peoples first started trading obsidian.  When Europeans arrived in the 19th century, mining took on a more prominent role and there are no signs of activities slowing down.

BC premier Christy Clark promised to bring eight mines in four years to the province when she was elected in 2011.  With the recent completion of the Northwest Transmission power line up the western border of BC, it looks like she can make good on her promise.

The first mine to make use of the new power line is the Red Chris Project, which is set to begin operations by the end of the year.  The Red Chris Project tailings dam is located near the Iskut River which is one of the main tributaries of the Stikine River – the largest river by volume in the Tongass National Forest and one of the largest producers of salmon.

The tailings dam at Red Chris is set to be 330 feet high and needs to hold 183 million tons of toxic tailings.  The mine will process 30,000 tons of ore per day for 28 years, according to owners, Imperial Metals Corporation.  The Imperial Metals Corporation is the same mining company that built the Mount Polley Mine.

All of the proposed mines will process tens of thousands of tons of ore per day with the largest mine, Kerr Sulphuretts Mitchell (KSM), set to process 120,000 tons of ore per day for 52 years.  Most of the proposed mines will be in operation for less than 25 years.

And, the Red Chris isn’t the only mine threatening southeast Alaskan watersheds.  The major salmon-producing watersheds in danger from the new mines are the Stikine, Unuk and the Taku.  Commercial and sport fishing are a $1 billion industry in southeast Alaska and salmon is also important for tourism and subsistence in the Tongass.  Should a tailings dam breach or another mining accident occur, these watersheds and southeast Alaskans that depend on them will bear the brunt of the risk.

Map showing the proposed mines in the Unuk and Stikine watersheds provided by Rivers Without Borders.

Alaskan senators, fishermen, conservationists and natives alike recognize the risks these new transboundary mines pose for southeast Alaska and the livelihood of the Tongass National Forest.  But, because Canada is the sovereign country, southeast Alaskans have no way to protect themselves from the dangers upstream.

The Boundary Waters Treaty places responsibility for any pollution in Alaskan waters from the mines on Canada, but little is required for pre-emptive action to prevent the pollution from ever occurring.

And it’s not just a major catastrophe like what happened at Mount Polley that Alaskans should worry about.  Dust from the mines could smother salmon eggs.  Leaking chemicals could kill salmon foods sources.  Increased copper in the water is believed to impair fish hearing and make them less able to avoid predators.  All of these side effects affect the survivability of the salmon before a major accident happens.

Preserving the last frontier

The Tongass National Forest is the largest in tact temperate rainforest in the world.  The forest is home to about 70,000 people that all depend on the healthy and sustainable fisheries found here.  Salmon is a part of the Alaskan way of life.  From commercial and sport fishing to subsistence, the five species of Pacific salmon are a lifeline for the culture and people.

As the FDA continues to test the limits of genetically modifying fish and more and more farmed fish make it on to American plates, we should be fighting harder to protect what wild and sustainable fisheries this country has left.  Fish that can grow bigger and fatter faster pose unforeseen threats to American health and only fulfill the wasteful desires to always have excess.  Fresh, wild fish should not be the delicacy, but the norm.

And finally… Alaska is America’s last frontier.  We are a nation of explorers, of entrepreneurs and innovation.  Part of that identity comes from the wilderness within our borders, the adventure that can be had in our own backyard.  But that wilderness is quickly disappearing and these mines might destroy the little that Alaska has left.  America needs wildness and should fight hard to protect it.

Sep 03 2014

First Fish Wednesday!

On Wednesday, Sept. 2, all schools in the Sitka public school system will be serving locally-caught fish! The school district will be serving fish every Wednesday this school year.

Sitka School District schools have been serving locally-caught fish in their school lunches for three years.  But starting today, kids will be eating coho caught right in their own backyard every Wednesday!

Fish to Schools was a brainchild of the fall 2010 Sitka Health Summit and a pilot program began in the spring of 2011 with Blatchley Middle School serving fish in school lunches once a month.  Since that time, the program has expanded to become a state-funded initiative that brings locally caught fish into public school lunches all across Alaska.

The Sitka Conservation Society has been an instrumental part of the program development, with Tracy Gagnon leading the charge.

“It’s a viable way to connect the fishing fleet to young people,” Gagnon said.  “It connects fishermen to the classroom.”

Gagnon said that they did not advertise as much for donations this year, but the support that came in was overwhelming.  They received double of what they asked for in this year’s donation drive – 1,000 pounds of fish.

“Overall it’s very exciting,” Gagnon said.  “What a generous fishing fleet!”

With state funding, the Sitka School District will be able to start paying fishermen to have their catches served in school lunches.

“Donating actual coho is so much more meaningful than writing a check,” Beth Short-Rhoads said.  She is one of the coordinators of the Fish to Schools program. “It’s like giving time on the ocean, the excitement of landing a gorgeous fish, and the satisfaction of working hard for a way of life they love,” she said.

Today, Wednesday Sept. 2, marks the first day of a fully year of fish lunches on Wednesdays. Lunches will be offered at Baranof Elementary, Keet Gooshi Heen, Blatchley Middle School, Sitka High School, Pacific High Schools, Mount Edgecumbe High School, SEER School, & Head Start.

“There’s a certain poetry that people eat food from the lands and waters around them. In Alaska, that means fish caught fresh from the Pacific and not fried chicken from Kentucky,” Alaska House Representative Jonathan Kreiss-Tomkins said.

Aug 28 2014

The Largest Mammal in the Tongass

Tourism is a $1 billion industry in southeast Alaska, fueled by visitors coming from all over the world to view the glaciers, bears, eagles and to experience the wilderness.  But, they also come for the whales!

North Pacific humpback whales inhabit southeast Alaskan waters all spring and summer long. Photo by Anna Bisaro/SCS

The population of North Pacific humpback whales in southeast Alaska used to be a lot higher, but humans actually almost hunted the animals to extinction.  Whale oil is very fuel efficient and used to power much of Juneau.  But, after whaling began, a population of 15,000 humpbacks reduced to only about 1,000.  Today, the whales are protected and even tour companies have regulations to keep from disrupting feeding patterns of the animals.

North Pacific Humpback whales can be seen around Sitka all summer long.  The humpback whales that inhabit these waters all summer likely spend their winters in the warmer waters surrounding Hawaii, Mexico, or in the western Pacific.  If you are looking for whales on the horizon, best to try and spot a surge of water, oxygen, carbon dioxide and maybe a little bit of whale snot shooting into the air.  The spouts that humpbacks send up into the air are exhalations of breath than can be at speeds of 300 miles per hour!   If you look carefully enough, you can see these spouts from shore!

The North Pacific humpback!  Photo by Anna Bisaro/SCS

Why Alaska in the spring and summer?  There is so much food for them to eat! Speaking of food, North Pacific humpbacks feed on herring and krill.  They take in tons of water into their mouths, and then as the water is released, their teeth act as filters and catch the fish in their mouths.  Despite the size of the animals, their throats are only the size of grapefruits. So they eat lots of really tiny food to fuel their big bodies.

Humpbacks feed in groups. Sometimes other animals will join in the fun, like stellar sea lions that are also looking for a treat! Photo by Anna Bisaro/SCS

Why are they called humpbacks?  Oh, that’s easy!  There is a large hump along the back of the whales.  Humpback whales also have very long flippers.  They can be distinguished from other whales from the size of their flippers which can be up to 25 or 30 percent of their body length.  Now for whales that can be up to 50 feet long – those flippers are rather large!  Humpbacks also weigh about one ton per foot of length. That means a 50 foot whale can weigh 50 tons!

This humpback is diving in view of Juneau’s Herbert Glacier. Photo by Anna Bisaro

The National Ocean Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) can actually keep track of the individual whales that make their way up to southeast Alaska every year.  The flukes (or tails) of humpbacks are unique to each individual.  They are like fingerprints and NOAA has names for individuals it has identified from photos of flukes.  Maybe next time you’re out on the water looking for whales you can snag a picture that NOAA can use to name a new whale visiting the southeast for the summer!

Every fluke on every humpback whale is unique like a human finger print! Photo by Anna Bisaro/SCS




Aug 26 2014

Fish Wednesday!

Fish to Schools started in the fall of 2010 and we’ve steadily grown the program over the last four years. We grew from one school to two to four to eight. We went from serving fish from once a month to twice a month to EVERY week. For the 2014-2015 school year the Sitka School District will be serving local fish lunches every Wednesday rotating between coho and rockfish. We’re so excited to see these healthy and sustainable lunches offered weekly. Fish to Schools is redefining what is possible for school food service. Scratch cooking? Yes! Local foods? Yes! Happy, healthy kids? Yes!

Take a listen to this sweet PSA featuring Ava and Emerson sharing the good news of weekly Wednesday lunches. Click this link:

Lunches will be offered at Baranof Elementary, Keet Gooshi Heen, Blatchley Middle School, Sitka High School, Pacific High Schools, Mount Edgecumbe High School, SEER School, & Head Start. You can ensure these lunches continue by showing your support for Fish to Schools and the Nutritional Alaskan Foods for Schools program—a grant that allows for the purchase of local foods in schools, like fish!


Aug 22 2014

Invasive tunicate still plaguing Whiting Harbor

As published in the Sitka Daily Sentinel on Wednesday, August 20, 2014

D vex is said to look like marine vomit. This picture was taken in Whiting Harbor after the discovery of the invasive. Photo courtesy of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game.

Scientists are searching for a method to eradicate the invasive tunicate species that has kept Whiting Harbor closed since 2010. This invasive sea squirt has been found all over the world and can have detrimental effects on marine ecosystems if not controlled. But killing the invasive, is not so easy.

“Sometimes people have this notion that you can just kill anything,” Ian Davidson, of the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Maryland, said in a recent interview. “There is not a standard template you can just follow and do.”

Whiting Harbor is the cove between the Northwest end of the airport runway and the causeway linking the islands of the Fort Rouseau State Historical Park. If not for the tunicate contamination, Whiting Harbor would be the preferred access to the state park, which is accessible only by boat.

This September, Davidson and other scientists from the Smithsonian will be testing a possible treatment method for the invasive tunicate to see if they might be able to remove the species from Whiting altogether.

Didemnum vexillum, or D vex, is a fast-growing sea squirt sometimes called marine vomit.  It has been found all over the world and has greatly impacted ecosystems off the coasts of New Zealand and Wales and has been particularly harmful to scallop populations near Massachusetts.  Scientists believe D vex originated in Japan.

“It establishes well over surfaces,” Tammy Davis, invasive species program director for the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, said.  “It’s a really fast grower.”

Fortunately for Sitka and the rest of Southeast Alaska, despite the fast-growing characteristics of D vex, surveyors have not found evidence of the tunicate spreading anywhere else in Alaska.

D vex often attaches to boats and fishing lines and is spread to other areas, so Davis said Whiting Harbor has been closed to all human activity since the discovery of the tunicate to limit the spread of the organism.  As for what brought it to Sitka, no one knows.

“We can’t say what the vector was,” Davis said.

Scientists can’t say just how long it’s been here either.

Marnie Chapman, a professor at University of Alaska Southeast, was on the bioblitz expedition that discovered the tunicate in 2010.

“It’s hard to identify on first look,” Chapman said.  If the scientists hadn’t realized what they had found, “that would have been a nightmare scenario,” she said.

Containing and ultimately eradicating the species is important because “invasive species compromise our sense of place,” she said.  “They take what is special and unique about a particular area and they make it less special.”

But while the tunicate has remained contained in Whiting Harbor, scientists still don’t know how to get rid of it.  Davidson explained part of the research this fall will be testing the effects of increased salt content in the water of the harbor.  A higher salinity of the water may help kill the tunicate, he said, but the scientists need to figure out if they can control the salt content in the harbor long enough to be effective.

Davidson’s team of scientists will return early next year or in the spring for full on experiments in eradication, he said.  This first trip is just testing the methods.

“I want to emphasize that this is not an eradication attempt, but rather a trial to determine how one might go about an eradication effort,” Linda McCann of the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center said.  “We face several challenges with the work,” she said including managing the delivery of the treatment and not harming the substrates the tunicate is attached to.

Davidson said that mobile creatures in the harbor will disperse if the salt content gets too high for them during the testing.  He said the scientists were not worried about other invertebrates that may not be able to escape, because they were positive the harbor would repopulate because of Sitka’s healthy intertidal zones.

Getting rid of the D vex tunicate in Whiting Harbor is another important step in the management process.  Davidson said Alaska has less of an invasive problem than many other coastline states, particularly California.

“Alaska has a stronger reason to protect its territory,” Davidson said.  “You can get back to a pristine condition.”

Aug 14 2014

Fish to Schools Recipe Challenge

Do you think you can make a fish recipe that is kid friendly, baked, low in fat, and low in sodium? Eight people were up to the challenge and participated in Sitka Conservation Society’s community recipe contest for Fish to Schools. The Sitka School District is already serving many delicious local fish entrees like rockfish tacos, teriyaki salmon, and fish & chips, but we wanted to diversify the menu and hear from you.

Families submitted recipes—one was created by an 8 year old!—and a panel of judges were ready with forks to judge the fish dishes on taste, kid-friendliness, ease of preparation, and nutrition. The judges spanned the stream to plate spectrum from seafood processor to student consumer.

The top three dishes were salmon patties, coconut pecan rockfish with blueberry dipping sauce, and salmon mac ‘n cheese. The other contenders: sesame-veggie salmon cakes with tangy apple slaw, salmon pinwheels, salmon fish fingers, salmon with dill, and salmon wraps. My mouth is salivating.

You be the judge and test the recipes out at home (and keep an eye out for them on the lunch tray). If you have a recipe that you would like to share, please submit it to We’d love to share it with food service and hope they’ll give it a try.

Thank you to our fine chefs:
Kathy Hope Erikson: Salmon Patties
Mike and Ava Newel (age 8): Coconut Pecan Rockfish with Blueberry Dipping Sauce
Zoe Trafton (age 8): Salmon Mac ’n Cheese
Beth Short-Rhoads and Kat Rhoads (age 6): Sesame-Veggie Salmon Cakes with Tangy Apple Slaw
Judi Ozment: Salmon Pinwheels
Anna Bisaro: Salmon Fish Fingers
Matt Jones, Salmon with Dill
Charles Bingham: Salmon Veggie Wraps

And our panel of judges:
Cassee Olin, Sitka School District
Lon Garrison, Sitka School Board
Zak Rioux, Student
Zoe Trafton, Student
Tim Ryan, Sitka Sound Seafoods
Kathy Warm
Caroline Lester
Matt Meizlish

Aug 11 2014

Living with the Land: Seaweed Harvest

“Living with the land” means having knowledge and familiarity with the natural environment that surrounds you.  Part of that knowledge is knowing what are the edible plants in the environment and when they are ready for harvest.  On the outer coast of Alaska in the Tongass National Forest, that also means knowing what seaweeds are edible.  Knowing Seaweeds means knowing when they are in best conditions for harvest, how they are processed, and what they can be used for.

Although there are great books on identifying plants and seaweeds and recipes for preparing, sometimes the best information (and most locally pertinent), comes from spending time with elders and listening to what they have learned over their lifetimes.

In this video, SCS staff Scott Harris, Tracy Gagnon, and Adam Andis spent a morning with long-time SCS board member Bob Ellis and absorbed some of his wisdom about seaweeds in the intertidal zones of the Sitka Sound.


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Keep up to date on all of the issues. Check out "The Southeaster" Blog.

  • Hungry for Huckleberry Pie, Venison Stew, or Fresh Greens? Come to the Wild Foods Potluck Nov. 2!
  • Stand Up to Corporate Influence!
  • Kayaking Kootznoowoo: Report on SCS’s Final Wilderness Trip
  • Encouraging Local Natural Resource Stewardship on the Tongass: Kennel Creek
  • Teaching the Alaska way of Life: 4-H in Sitka
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