Sitka Conservation Society
Aug 09 2012

Saint Lazaria



We sat quietly in the colony struggling not to make noise for fear of scaring the birds.  It was about ten o’clock at night and the sun was still setting.  To the west the sun sank over the horizon and the last few flickers of light colored the approaching clouds.  To our east and south the full moon rose in a brilliant orange, promising to illuminate our night’s work. The scene was dreamlike, surreal.

Part of what makes Saint Lazaria so unique is its somewhat unusual land use designation.  The island of Saint Lazaria is part of the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Homer, AK.  It is also a designated Wilderness Area protected under the National Wilderness Preservation System.  This multi-level protection has kept the island in pristine condition.

My work with SCS brought me to Saint Lazaria to learn about Alexis Will and the research she is conducting on the island.  Will is a graduate student at the University of Alaska Fairbanks where she is working towards her Masters’ of Science in Biology and Wildlife.  For her thesis she is trying to determine the diets and foraging grounds of Rhinocerous Auklets (i.e., Cerorhinca monocerata).  Will believes that by better understanding this species’ diet and foraging grounds, we will better understand how these birds may adapt to an increasingly variable environment.

Will’s research is also part of a bigger study.  In recent years the population of five key groundfish species in the Gulf of Alaska have been significantly lower than in previous years.  This is particularly alarming as these five fish species are all commercially important to the state.  To determine what is causing this decline, the North Pacific Research Board is currently in the process of conducting a Gulf of Alaska-wide study. Their goal is to better understand the causes for these declining populations.

So how does Will’s research fit in to this bigger project?

Here’s the thing.  Rhinocerous Auclets feed on the same fish that the five groundfish species feed on.  If Alexis can determine where and how much fish the Saint Lazaria Rhinocerous Auclets are eating, then we will have a better picture of the food base in the Gulf, at least, theoretically.  With better information on the health of the food base in the Gulf, the state of Alaska will have better science with which to base their fishing quotas.  It’s cool research and I was glad to have the opportunity to learn more about it.

However, what intrigued me most about Saint Lazaria was my experience in the Rhino colony.  The Rhinoceros Auklet colony is located at the edge of a very steep and menacing cliff.  Below the cliff we could see the commercial salmon fleet at anchor, protected in the lee of the island. As the Rhinos arrived at their nest to feed their chicks, the commercial trolling fleet sat below bracing for the approaching gale, and in the distance the lights of Sitka illuminated the night sky.  As I sat in the darkabsorbing the night’s activities, I was reminded of the simple fact that we are ALL part of this global ecosystem.

Aug 04 2012

Hoonah Sound to Lisianski Strait to Goulding Harbor: A Chichagof Wilderness Expedition through Intact Watersheds

Anyone that tells you there is a trail between Hoonah Sound and Lisianski Strait because “it’s on the map,” has never been there on foot. This is because there is no trail there!   An SCS Wilderness Groundtruthing team recently explored that area on the Tongass and confirmed that the only trails available are the ones made by deer and bear.

The purpose of this expedition was to look at habitat connectivity and bear use.  Members of the expedition were wildlife biologist Jon Martin, mountain goat hunting guide and outdoorsman Kevin Johnson, photographer Ben Hamilton, and SCS Executive Director Andrew Thoms.

SCS is interested in this landscape because of the protections given to these areas.  The land between Hoonah Sound and Lisianski Strait is protected as LUD II – a Congressional roadless designation status meant to protect “the area’s wildland characteristics.”  The lands between Lisianski Strait and Goulding Harbor are part of the West Chichagof-Yacobi Wilderness where management is to “provide opportunities for solitude where humans are visitors.”   Management language aside, the most important thing about these areas is that they are large, contiguous protected areas where an entire watershed from the high-ridges to the estuaries is left in its natural condition.  This means that these watersheds are able to function with no impact from roads, logging, mining, or other human activities.

What this looks like on the ground is a pristine habitat teaming with bears, deer, and rivers and lakes filled with salmon and trout.  There are also many surprises: on this trip, we found a native species of lamprey spawning in a river creek that no one in the group has ever seen before (and the group had over 60 years of experience on the Tongass).  We also found fishing holes where trout bit on every cast, back-pools in river tributaries filled with Coho Smolts, forests with peaceful glens and thorny devil’s club thickets, and pristine lakes surrounded by towering mountains.

If any place should be protected on the Tongass, it is these watersheds.  The Lisianski River is a salmon and trout power-house and produces ample salmon for bears that live in the estuary and trollers that fish the outside waters.  One can’t help but feel grateful walking along the river and through the forests here, thankful that someone had the foresight to set this place aside. Clear-cutting logging wild places like these provides paltry returns in comparison to the salmon they produce and all the other life they sustain.

These watersheds that we walked through are success stories and teach us how the temperate rainforest environment works in its natural unaltered state and how much value they produce following their own rhythms.  The actions taken in the past to set these areas aside give us pause to think about what we should be doing today to invest in our future and protect ecosystems that are similarly important ecologically.

Scientists have identified over 77 other watersheds across the Tongass that produce massive amounts of salmon and have ecological characteristics that need to be protected.  Some of these watersheds are slated to be logged by the Forest Service.  Even worse, pending Sealaska legislation could result in some of these watersheds being privatized, sacrificing protection for salmon streams and spawning habitat.  With your help and involvement, SCS is working to protect those watersheds and landscapes so that we can ensure the consideration of long-term health and resource benefits from these watersheds over the short-term gains of logging, road-building, or privatization.  It is our responsibility that we make the right choices and that future generations are grateful for what we leave them to explore and benefit from.

If you want to be part of SCS’s work to protect lands and waters of the Tongass, please contact us and we’ll tell you how you can help.  If you are inspired, write a letter to our senators and tell them to protect salmon on the Tongass and manage it for Salmon: here


Jul 16 2012

Wilderness: A glimpse at the American experience

Wilderness: A glimpse at the American experience

While studying visitor use in wilderness areas is an everyday part of my job, I’ve found that explaining what makes a wilderness area different from a large grouping of trees has become the largest secondary part of my work experience.

So what does make the land outside of town in wilderness or something else entirely? By stating wilderness areas in America are lands designated by congress for recreation would be correct, but the concept gets more muddled when breaking it all down. The take home message for wilderness areas is that they are lands designated for the American people to use. The language in the wilderness act tells us that wilderness exists for the enjoyment of the public and with regulations in hopes future generations have the chance for like experiences.

Recognizing these wilderness areas are places set aside which harbor some of the best natural landscapes in the world is a must. For instance, the wilderness areas near Sitka Alaska harbor old growth stands that rise up dramatically forming awe inspiring landscapes that are both magical to witness and imperative for a whole host of specie’s survival. For arguments sake I’ll point out the one such species, marbled murrelets, which are unique sea birds requiring old growth tree stands for nesting.

So, having distinguished that these special places require careful considerations, what types of restrictions attempt to help lessen human impacts? The big restrictions mostly revolve around having no mechanized use, specifically things like helicopters, chainsaws, or even bicycles. The purpose behind these restrictions is to allow the American people real opportunities for wilderness solitude in unspoiled natural areas.

Additionally wilderness lands are not specifically designed for entrepreneurs to exploit as other larger tracks of federal land encompass a variety of use options such as timber harvesting. However, with delicate use wilderness guides help transport people into places otherwise not available to the average citizen.

The central theme of the American wilderness experience is providing a place where a person can travel and feel like the natural world still exists. The small restrictions on use help ensure these beautifully wild places will continue to exist at the same capacities in the future. Additionally, the price of experiencing truly natural places is invaluable and having wilderness remain pristine during these days of ever shrinking wild lands is vital for the American experience.

Recapping, wilderness is an area of federally designated land, set aside for the American public to enjoy in the most natural ways possible. There are restrictions on use to ensure future generations have the opportunity to continue to enjoy these places without man’s overwhelming influences. For most of us that means the perfect place for viewing a bear with cubs, finding the perfect place for an outdoor adventure, seeing the pictures our friends and loved ones share with us from magical places, or simply knowing that the natural environment witnessed today will exist tomorrow.


Jul 16 2012

Meet Paul: Wilderness Intern



Hello Friends,

This summer I have the great opportunity of interning with the Sitka Conservation Society and the United States Forest Service’s Sitka Ranger District. I am excited for getting on with my duties revolving around visitor use studies in the Tongass National Forest and sharing my experiences.

So without further ado let me officially introduce my blog spot; I will share my travels into the Tongass National Forest’s officially designated Wilderness and national forest lands, which yes indeed differs from a patch of unoccupied trees outside of town. With this glimpse into my summer I hope to paint pictures of interesting experiences with the people, land, and wildlife.

Let’s get started with some background:

I have had the great fortune of residing in a variety of places throughout the country including Oklahoma, Texas, Louisiana, Maine, California, and Alaska. Moreover, I’ve rambled into some of the most beautiful spots in America on road trips, vacations, and pure itchy feet adventures. Throughout my life I have been attracted to the wilder places, and at a certain point I found a need to help positively impact these most special places. In a nutshell this is how I find myself in my last semester studying Recreation Management at The University of Maine Machias and visitor use in Alaska’s Tongass National Forest for the summer.

Thank you for following me through my travels and please remember the places I will discuss exist only in the visitor use capacities they currently hold due to previous public support and require public participation to remain at the current levels.


Jul 10 2012

Exciting Opportunities to Piggy-back with SCS and Reach Remote Locations!

The Sitka Conservation Society field crews are doing remote field work throughout the Tongass this summer.   Our field work this summer includes salmon-habitat restoration work at Sitkoh River and Sitkoh Lake, ecosystem conservation and connectivity work in Hoonah Sound, invasive plant removal in Wilderness Areas, helping teach a visiting University course on Alaska’s Forests, Fisheries and Wilderness, and much more.   On some of the trips, there are opportunities to jump on some of our flights or transport to get out to remote locations.  We hope that SCS members can take advantage of these opportunities and  get out to know and experience our Tongass backyard!

1)  Kayak Drop Off at False Island in Peril Straits, July 13th, $150:  Have you ever wanted to paddle the coast of the infamous Deadman’s Reach, watch for bubble-net feeding whales off Povorotni Island, walk through the majestic stands of Sitka Spruce in Ushk Bay, and ride the tidal currents through Segius Narrows?    Next weekend could be your chance to do it!!!  SCS is taking an Allen Marine transport boat that will be picking up a University Class at False Island on July 13th at 9am.  We have room for a total of 9 kayaks and camping gear (can be double Kayaks).   Reserve your spot on this transport and Kayak drop-off for $150 by contacting or 747-7509 (fee helps pay for transport to the site.  You are responsible for your own expedition, gear, etc.  We will drop you off at the False Island dock)

2) Peril Strait Boat Cruise Ride-Along, July 13th, $45:  The trip from Sitka North through Peril Straits is a maze of twisting waterways, islands, mountains, treacherous tidal currents, and beautiful bays and coves.  Ride along with SCS on an Allen Marine Boat for a pick-up at False Island.  The boat will leave at 9am and will return at approximately 1pm.  Bring your charts and see if you can follow-along with the route through the passage that separates Baranof and Chichagof Islands!  There are only 2 spots available on this trip so if you are interested in this opportunity to travel through Peril Straits, get your tickets now at SCS Offices.

3)  Float Plane Drop-off at Goulding Harbor in the West Chichagof Wilderness Area July 30th or 31st ($150/person):   Goulding Harbor is one of the most spectacular nooks in the West Chichagof Wilderness Areas.  Its unique shoreline is dimpled and littered with islets and coves and the long sloping beaches make for great brown bear habitat.  Two trail-heads depart from Goulding Harbor. One leads to White Sulfur Springs and the other follows an old mining rail-road to the Goulding Lakes.  It is an amazing place for a  wild and remote Wilderness Adventure.  SCS has scheduled a float plane pick-up at Goulding Harbor for a crew that will be coming in from a Wilderness expedition.  If you would like to take advantage of a float-plane drop off to explore the Goulding Harbor Area, this is your chance.  Contact (747-7509) for more information (This is a drop-off only.  Participants are responsible for their own travel plans and arrangements after drop-off).

Keep watching for more opportunities to get out and explore the Tongass.  SCS already has boat cruises scheduled and there may be more opportunities to piggy-back for travel to remote Wilderness Areas!


May 29 2012

Kayak Skills/Rescue & Wilderness Monitoring Training

Saturday, June 9 and Sunday, June 10, 2012, 10am-5pm

ACA instructors Adam Andis and Darrin Kelly will teach all of the skills you need to be a safe and confident paddler, so that you can get out and enjoy our coastal wilderness areas and volunteer with the Sitka Community Wilderness Stewardship Project to collect needed baseline data. The class will include kayak skills for beginning to advanced paddlers, self and assisted rescue training, and Wilderness monitoring training, including an invasive plant ID lesson from Kitty LaBounty.

This two day course is open only to current SCS members so be sure to join or renew your membership when you sign up. Space is very limited, so sign up early!

To sign up or for more information, contact SCS at 747-7509.

Cost is $75 for the 2-day course (drysuits included). Kayak rental is $35 per day through Latitude Adventures. A 10% will be offered to participants who provide their own drysuit.

Skills Course Agenda:

Day 1

1000 Introduction (15 min)

  • Intros- instructors, SCS, Wilderness Project
  • Itinerary
  • Site logistics- food, water, hot drinks, bathroom, changing area
  • ACA
  • outline course expectations
  • safety briefing- PFD always on in water, helmets, hypothermia risk & mitigation, paying attention to each other and instructors)
  • liability release

1015 On Shore Presentations (55 min)

  • Equipment orientation – drysuits later
  • Personal clothing and gear
  • PFD’s, wetsuits, spray skirts
  • Safety equipment
  • Basic boat design and kayak terminology
  • Boat fit and adjustment
  • Boat/body weld
  • Foot brace adjustment
  • Spray skirt attachment/release
  • Dry land “wet exit” drill
  • Paddle orientation and use
  • basic paddle technique

1110 Break (5 min)

1115 Launching & Landing (30min)

  • The paddling environment: wind, waves, weather, water (overview)
  • Carrying kayak to and from water
  • Entry/exit of kayak from shore or dock
  • Boat stability, “hip wiggle,”
  • Allow students a few minutes to paddle around and get oriented with their kayak

1145 Basic Strokes & Skills (60 min)

  • Rafting up
  • Sweep stroke (forward/reverse/pivot in place)
  • Forward Stroke
  • Reverse stroke and stopping
  • Draw stroke

High and low braces (hip snap/boat lean/lower body control) – discussion, not practice

1245 Lunch (30 min)

  • risk management triangle

1315 Rescues (3 hr 15 min)

  • hi and low brace
  • t-rescue demo (2 instructors)
  • stirrup demonstration
  • assisted rescue variations (stirrup, swamping the kayak)
  • students practice
  • paddle-float demo
  • students practice
  • paddle-float re-entry and roll (if time available)
  • advanced bracing- sculling
  • all-in practice

1630 Wrap up (20 min)

  • get out of dry suits

1650 Debrief (10 min)

  • tomorrow’s itinerary


Day 2

1000 Monitoring Training (1hr 50 min)

  • Plant ID Training (Kitty LaBounty) (40 min)
  • Solitude Monitoring (20 min)
  • History of Wilderness/Wilderness Character (10 min)
  • LNT and Rec. Site (40)

1150 Paddling Environment (extended) (50 min)

  • Tides- theory and practice
  • Charts
  • Weather
  • Basic navigation

1240 Lunch (45 min)

  • Expectations for the day
  • Prepare to get on the water- get dressed, personal gear and snacks, fill water bottles

1325 Practice and tour (3 hr 5 min)

  • Skills and limitations (next steps)
  • staying together
  • emergencies
  • boat traffic
  • skills- stroke refinement, edging, running draws
  • continued LNT training and practice
  • Communication- equipment and protocol
    • Signaling
    • Boat traffic/Rules of the Road
    • “What’s in my PFD?” and “What’s in my cockpit?”

1630 Return and Debrief (30 min)

  • Return gear
  • Thanks and continue to stay involved in SCS Wilderness Project
May 08 2012

“Calvin” Cave

CALVIN CAVE is named for Jack Calvin one of the original founders of the Sitka Conservation Society who helped to protect West Chichagof as a Wilderness area.  The following report and map were produced by Kevin Allred with the Tongass Cave Project.  Kevin joined the SCS Wilderness crew on a trip to West Chichagof in the summer of 2011.  See videos of the trip here.

DESCRIPTION: Calvin Cave was discovered on June 19, 2011 by Kevin Allred, and the Sitka Conservation Society Wilderness crew: Adam Andis, Tomas Ward, and Ben Hamilton, while searching for caves as part of the Sitka Community Wilderness Stewardship Project. The cave is located at the lower edge of a large muskeg which provides acidic waters where it flows onto the band of Whitestripe Marble of Triassic age. After a meandering stream slot, the small stream enters the cave, which is a winding narrow crack downcut into the marble. Down the slope are a series of sinkholes which indicate the downstream course of the underground stream. After about 60 feet the cave ends in too tight constrictions at the bottom of the first of these sinkholes, and daylight is seen in several places. There is an excellent example of the underside of a “sealed” sinkhole with its characteristic humus plug here. The cave was surveyed by Kevin Allred and Tom Ward. Its vertical surveyed depth is 10 feet and it has 63.8 feet of surveyed passage. The resurgence of this cave stream is not known, but is probably somewhere adjacent or under the nearby gorge of Marble Creek.

BIOLOGY: Fungus gnat webs were noted throughout the cave, but no insects were seen. No bones were seen.

MANAGEMENT RECOMMENDATIONS: Due to its remoteness, Calvin Cave is not likely to be negatively impacted by visitation. It is protected from logging under Wilderness Area regulation.


Feb 28 2012

Seeking Summer Wilderness Intern

The Sitka Conservation Society is seeking an applicant to support the Sitka Community Wilderness Stewardship Project. The Wilderness Intern will assist SCS’s Wilderness Project manager to coordinate and lead monitoring expeditions during the 2012 summer field season.

If interested, please review the position description below and submit a resume and cover letter to Adam Andis at


This position is now closed.

Position Title: SCS Wilderness Project Internship


Host Organizations: Sitka Conservation Society

Location:  Sitka, Alaska

Duration: 14 weeks, starting in May 2013.  Specific start and end dates to be determined by intern and SCS

Compensation: $ 4664 plus travel

Benefits: Intern will receive no health or dental benefits.  Intern is responsible for housing (SCS will try to assist in finding low-cost housing options).  SCS will provide appropriate training for fieldwork in Southeast Alaska.

Organization:  The Sitka Conservation Society (SCS) is a grassroots, membership-based organization dedicated to the conservation of the Tongass Temperate Rainforest and the protection of Sitka’s quality of life.  We have been active in Sitka, Alaska for over 45 years as a dynamic and concerned group of citizens who have an invested interest in their surrounding natural environment and the future well-being of their community. We are based in the small coastal town of Sitka, Alaska, located on the rugged outer west coast of Baranof Island. Surrounded by the towering trees of the Tongass National Rainforest, the community has successfully transformed from an industrial past and the closure of a local pulp mill to a new economy featuring a diversity of employers and small businesses.

Background:  The Tongass National Forest in Southeast Alaska is the nation’s largest National Forest totaling 17 million acres with almost 6 million acres of designated Wilderness Area (also the largest total Wilderness area of any National Forest).  The Sitka Ranger District alone encompasses over 1.6 million acres of countless islands, glaciated peaks and old growth forests. In 2009, SCS partnered with the Sitka Ranger District (SRD) to ensure the two Wilderness areas near Sitka (the West Chichagof Yakobi and South Baranof Wilderness Areas) meet a minimum management standard by conducting stewardship and monitoring activities and recruiting volunteers. We will be continuing this project into its fifth year and extending the project to ranger districts throughout the Tongass National Forest.



Direction and Purpose: 

                In this position you will be expected to assist in organizing the logistics of field trips.  Trips can range from just a few nights to three weeks.  Backcountry field logistics include float plane and boat transport to and from field sites; kayaking, backpacking, and packrafting on location; camping and living in bear country; field communications via satellite phone, VHF radio, and SPOT transmitters.  You will be co-leading trips with SCS Staff.  Depending on experience, you may have the opportunity to lead short trips of volunteers on your own.  

Working with SCS Staff, this intern position will assist in the following duties:

  • ·         collection of field data
  • ·         coordinating logistics and volunteers for field surveys
  • ·         plan and conduct outreach activities including preparing presentation and sharing materials on Wilderness and Leave No Trace with outfitters/guides and other Forest users.
  • prepare and submit an intern summary report and portfolio of all produced materials, and other compiled outputs to the Forest Service and SCS before conclusion of the residency, including digital photos of your work experience and recreational activities in Alaska. Reports are crucial means for SCS  to report on the project’s success.


  • ·         Graduate or currently enrolled in Recreation Management, Outdoor Education, Environmental Studies or other related environmental field
  • ·         Current Wilderness First Responder certification (by start date of position)
  • ·         Outdoor skills including Leave-no-Trace camping, sea kayaking, multi-day backpacking
  • ·         Ability to work in a team while also independently problem-solve in sometimes difficult field conditions.
  • ·         Ability to communicate effectively and present issues to the lay-public in a way that is educational, inspirational, and lasting

The ideal candidate will also have:

  • ·         Experience living or working in Southeast Alaska
  • ·         Pertinent work experience
  • ·         Outdoor leadership experience such as NOLS or Outward Bound
  • ·         Ability to work under challenging field conditions that require flexibility and a positive attitude
  • ·         Proven attention to detail including field data collection
  • ·         Experience camping in bear country
  • ·         Advanced sea-kayaking skills including surf zone and ability to perform rolls and rescues


Fiscal Support: SCS will provide a stipend of $4,664 for this 14 week position.  SCS will also provide up to $1,000 to cover the lowest cost airfare from the resident’s current location to Sitka. Airfare will be reimbursed upon submittal of receipts to SCS.



With respect to agency/organization policy and safety, intern agrees to:

  • ·         Adhere to the policies and direction of SCS, including safety-related requirements and training, including those related to remote travel and field work.
  • ·         Work closely with the SCS Wilderness Project Coordinator to update him/her on accomplishments and ensure that any questions, concerns or needs are addressed.
  • ·         Be a good representative of SCS at all times during your internship.
  • ·         Arrange course credits with your university if applicable.


With respect to general logistics, resident agrees to:

  • Seek lowest possible round trip airfare or ferry trip and book as soon as possible and before May 1st, working in conjunction with SCS whenever possible;
  • Provide SCS with travel itinerary as soon as flight is booked and before arriving in Alaska. Please email itinerary to Adam Andis at
  • Reimburse SCS for the cost of travel if you leave the intern position before the end of your assignment.
  • Have fun and enjoy the experience in Sitka!


Timeline (Approximate)

May 20-June 1:  SCS and Forest Service trainings; get oriented and set up in offices; begin researching and getting up-to-speed on background info (Outfitter/Guide Use Areas, patterns of use on the Tongass National Forest (subsistence, commercial fishing, guided, recreation), Wilderness Character monitoring, Wilderness issues).

June 4 – August 17:  Participate in field trips and assist in coordinating future trips, contact Outfitter and Guides to distribute educational materials, assist SCS in other Wilderness stewardship activities.

By August 20-24:  Prepare final report including any outreach or media products, trip reports, and written summary of experience to SCS.  Work with Wilderness Project Coordinator on final reports. 




To apply please submit a cover letter and resume that includes relevant skills and experiences including documentation of trips in remote settings to Adam Andis:

Application will close March 31, 2013.


Feb 09 2012

Wilderness Expedition Grant 2012

Sitka Community Wilderness Stewardship Project
Expedition Grant Program

Description: The Community Wilderness Stewardship Project monitors the two Wilderness areas that the Sitka Conservation Society helped to create, the West Chichagof-Yakobi Wilderness and the South Baranof Wilderness. We conduct research expeditions to collect data ranging from botanical surveys to small mammal genetic mapping to glacial change research. These remote study areas are difficult and expensive to access. For this reason, we seek research partners to broaden the scope of the project and ensure that the trips are as effective as possible.
Ideal candidates for Expedition Grants would include partnerships with other institutions, organizations, or agencies; focus on priority sites within Wilderness areas; incorporate an outreach component; and include additional outside funding.

Location: Based out of Sitka, Alaska.  Research must occur within West Chichagof-Yakobi Wilderness Area or South Baranof Wilderness Area.

Dates: May – December 2012
Proposals due by: May 1, 2012

Compensation: SCS may fund up to $1000

To Apply: Submit proposal* and cover letter to Adam Andis-

* Research in Forest Service Wilderness Areas requires a special permitting process.  SCS staff will help facilitate the research permit application, but it is the responsibility of the applicant to complete all necessary forms and work with the Sitka Ranger District  to receive a temporary research permit for the project.  See useful resources below.


Scientific Activities Evaluation Framework- Use this evaluation framework to apply for research permits.  The actual application begins on page 54.

Guidelines for Scientists- The following guidelines are written for scientists who want to conduct scientific activities in
wilderness. These are only brief guidelines intended to help scientists understand and
communicate with local managers, thereby expediting the process of evaluating a proposal for
scientific activities.

Example proposals:

Expedition Grant Proposal 2011- Establishing Baseline and Groundtruthing Data within the West Chichagof-­Yakobi Wilderness, Chichagof Island, Alaska

Project Proposal 2010- Glacial Change on Baranof Island: Quantifying Local-level Impact of Climate Change

Feb 06 2012

UPDATE 2/6: Boy Scout Troop 40 Adopts the Stikine

In June of 2012, members of Wrangell’s Boy Scout Troop 40 joined forces with the Southeast Alaska Conservation Council (SEACC), the Sitka Conservation Society (SCS), the United States Forest Service and local volunteers to help remove invasive plants from the Stikine-LeConte Wilderness Area.  The objective of the trip was to remove the aggressive reed cannery grass from the banks of the Twin Lakes by hand pulling the plants as well as covering areas with sheets of black plastic.  The group also helped remove an enormous amount of buttercups and dandelions from the lakes’ shoreline.

However, the ultimate goal of the trip was to teach the Boy Scouts what it means to be good stewards of the land and the value of Wilderness areas like the Stikine.  What better way is there to teach this lesson then to spend five days in the Wilderness learning these lessons first hand from the land and from each other?

After five days in the field, Troop 40 decided to adopt the Twin Lakes area as their ongoing stewardship project.  They plan to return in the coming years to continue the work that they’ve started.  It is community dedication like this that the Stikine and other wilderness areas require in order to remain pristine for future generations.

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  • Hungry for Huckleberry Pie, Venison Stew, or Fresh Greens? Come to the Wild Foods Potluck Nov. 2!
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  • Encouraging Local Natural Resource Stewardship on the Tongass: Kennel Creek
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