Sitka Conservation Society
Mar 15 2013

Students at Blatchley Love Local Fish Lunches

Over the last several weeks, Fish to Schools has been teaching 7th graders at Blatchley Middle School about salmon’s journey from the stream to our plates. The students learned about salmon management, gutting and filleting salmon, how local processors operate, how to smoke salmon, and more. After learning this process, the students had incredible things to say about the local fish lunches they eat at school. Listen and read what these insightful students said:

Listen to what students to Blatchley said about the local fish lunches!

“I like it because it takes amazing, it’s fresh, and it comes from our local fishermen that spend time and

money to go get it for us”

“I like it because it’s healthy and it’s nice that the fishermen do this for our school”

“It tastes really really good, and it’s a good chance for people to try new things”

“I eat it because it’s a way of saying thank you to the fishermen who catch the fish”

“Because it’s healthy and good for you, and you feel good after you eat it”

“It supports our economy and it tastes good”


Feb 22 2013

Often Imitated, Never Duplicated: Tongass Wild Salmon

Ask anyone where the best salmon is caught, and they’ll answer: Alaska.

Ask an Alaskan where the best salmon is caught, and they’ll answer: Southeast.

The Wild Salmon fisheries of Southeast Alaska provides nearly 30% of the global supply of wild salmon.  The 57,000 plus miles of rivers, streams, and creeks throughout the Tongass National Forest provides unparalleled spawning habitat for all five species of salmon: pink, chum, coho, sockeye and king.  Neighboring rivers in British Columbia and in Southcentral Alaska, as well as the salmon released each year from hatcheries throughout Southeast, also contribute to the robust fisheries we have here.







But just how many salmon caught each year are true Tongass Salmon: spawned and raised in waterways within the Tongass National Forest?

Ron Medel, the Tongass Fisheries Program Manager, found out just that.  The Alaska Department of Fish and Game keeps a close eye on salmon throughout the state, and each year produce an estimate regarding how many landed fish come from hatcheries versus wild stocks.  Fisheries data from British Columbia’s portions of the Stikine, Taku and other salmon streams were also considered and factored out of the Southeast total harvest.  Combining all this data, utilizing the power of spreadsheets and some elbow grease… Medel extrapolated that about 79% of the annual harvest in Southeast Alaska are from wild salmon that originated from the Tongass National Forest.

Even though the Tongass forest is such an important element in the Southeast Alaska salmon harvest, the US Forest Service has not allocated its funding and attention to the restoration and continued health of salmon spawning habitat within the forest.  Only a small portion of their budget – only about $7 million out of the nearly $63 million budget – is spent on the fisheries and watershed program which directly impacts fisheries conditions and restores salmon habitat (timber harvest and road building receive $20 million).  The health of the streams and watersheds that produce nearly $1 BILLION each year through commercial, sport and subsistence salmon harvesting is receiving so little support from the US Forest Service – what sort of salmon fishery would we have in Southeast Alaska if the Forest Service put more of their budget to supporting salmon and restoring all of the damage that was done by the historic clear-cut logging?

Wild, Tongass-raised salmon may make up 79% of the salmon caught in Southeast Alaska each year, but those salmon forests, waterways, fisheries and markets need our support, our time, our energy, our concern in order to continue.


Take action to encourage the Forest Service to put more support into stream restoration and watershed health!  Your input is needed now to help Congress and the Forest Service prioritize where the American public wants to invest our tax dollars in public land management!



Feb 18 2013

America’s Salmon Forest at the AK Forum Film Fest

SCS’s short documentary Restoring America’s Salmon Forest was selected to show at the Alaska Forum on the Environment Film Festival on Friday, February 8, 2013 in Anchorage.  The film focuses on a multi-agency effort to increase salmon returns on the Sitkoh River in Southeast Alaska’s Chichagof Island, by improving the spawning and rearing habitat and redirecting a river that was heavily damaged by logging operations in the 1970s.

In the heyday of the Southeast Alaska timber industry, little regard was paid to the needs of salmon. Streams were frequently blocked and diverted, with streams in 70 major watersheds remaining that way decades later. Salmon surpassed timber in economic importance in Southeast Alaska more than two decades ago, but only in the last few years has the Forest Service finally made a serious effort to repair damaged streams. Currently over 7,000 jobs in Southeast Alaska are tied to the fishing industry, compared to about 200 in the timber industry. The Forest Service spends about three times as much on timber related projects as fisheries and restoration projects each year on the Tongass.

While salmon are responsible for 10 times as many jobs in Southeast Alaska as timber, and are also an important food source and a critical part of our cultural identity, the Forest Service still puts timber over salmon in its budget priorities. Recent Forest Service budgets have dedicated in the range of $22 million a year to timber and road building, compared to less than $2 million a year to restoring salmon streams damaged by past logging, despite a $100 million backlog of restoration projects.

Logging damages watersheds by diverting streams, blocking fish passage, and eliminating crucial spawning and rearing habitat structures. Restoration increases salmon returns by removing debris, redirecting streams, stabilizing banks to prevent erosion, and even thinning dense second-growth forest. We believe it simply makes sense to go back and repair habitat if you are responsible for its damage.


Please contact your representatives in Washington to tell them the ways you depend on Tongass salmon, and tell them you support managing the Tongass for salmon and permanently protecting important salmon producing watersheds. Tell them it is time to redirect funds from the bloated timber budget to the salmon restoration budget, and finally transitioning away from the culture of old-growth timber to sustainable practices recognizing all resources and opportunities.

What to say:

Check out the talking points in this post for some ideas of what you might include in your letters or calls.


Undersecretary Robert Bonnie
Department of Natural Resources and the Environment
U.S. Department of Agriculture
1400 Independence Ave., S.W.
Washington, DC 20250


Senator Lisa Murkowski
709 Hart Senate Building
Washington, DC 20510


Senator Mark Begich
825C Hart Senate Building
Washington, DC 20510

If you have questions, contact the Sitka Conservation Society at 747-7509 or

Produced by Bethany Goodrich, a summer staffer at the Sitka Conservation Society, “Restoring Alaska’s Salmon Forest” provides a brief look at how a restoration project looks on the ground and what such a project can accomplish in terms of salmon returns.
Feb 16 2013

The Renewable Energy: People Power used in the Protection of our Wild Salmon

“Aint no power like the power of the people ‘cause the power of the people don’t stop!” We as a community have great potential to create the change we want to see in the world because this change is initiated by something we all have—our voice. We have the ability to envision things differently, contemplate the steps necessary to enact our vision, and then put those steps into action through our words, community involvement, and passion. These efforts typically don’t have to start with a large group of people because change can begin with an individual, and that individual could be you.

When I met local Sitkan Paul Rioux and experienced his determination to raise awareness about genetically engineered salmon, I was seeing firsthand the power of voice and the importance of standing up for your beliefs. For Paul, organizing a rally that would protest genetically engineered salmon was one of those ways to stand up. “I saw that there were rallies going on in other parts of the country, and I decided that it would be nice to do one here,” Paul said. Through Paul’s actions, over 130 people came to the rally, which was then publicized by Senator Murkowski, Senator Begich, and Representative Jonathan Kreiss-Tomkins. Four days after the event, the Food and Drug Administration announced they were going to extend the period to comment on genetically engineered salmon by 60 days, with the new date being April 26th, 2013. I’m certain that Sitka’s activism helped spur this extension.

To make this happen, we started small. We gained support from fishing organizations like the Alaska Longline Fishermen’s Association (ALFA) and the Alaska Troller’s Association (ATA), who passed the message on to their members; we held sign-making parties at the SCS office, Blatchley Middle School, and Ventures; flyers were created, posted, and handed out, featuring both information on the rally and how to submit a comment to the FDA opposing genetically engineered salmon; Raven Radio had us on their Morning Interview, where myself, Paul, and David Wilcox, a Blatchley middle school student running across the country in protest of genetically modified organisms (GMOs), discussed the negative impacts of genetically engineered salmon; both the Mudflats blog and Fish Radio with Laine Welch hosted information on the rally to raise awareness to their subscribers that the FDA was considering approving genetically engineered salmon; and the day of the event, the local news station, the Sitka Sentinel, and Raven Radio came out to document the event, which made it on the front page of the paper. Days after the rally, Sitka’s Assembly also approved, on a 7-0 vote, a resolution stating the city’s opposition to frankenfish.

Technology more than ever can be used to organize our social networks, tell our stories to folks that live in communities all over the country, and enforce our opinion to decision makers to listen to their constituents. This can happen with any issue that we find ourselves passionate about, and for Paul that issue was the health of our wild salmon from the Tongass.

It is right here in our community that we can create the world we want to see through our actions, but this can only happen through an engaged, active citizenry. Far too often I encounter folks who are somewhat cynical to the democratic process, folks that have lost faith in the power of their voice.  But in the end, if no one takes action, nothing gets done.

What kind of world do you want to live in? For us at the Sitka Conservation Society, we want the management of the Tongass to benefit the communities that depend upon its natural resources while supporting the habitats of the salmon, black tail-deer, and bears that roam wildly about. Sitkans like Paul Rioux remind us that our voice is a catalyst for change, and by speaking and standing up for what you believe in, we can continuously create the world we want to live in. Let us stand up together, generate the renewable energy of people power, and work towards that future some say is a dream but can be a reality if we work towards it.

If you haven’t submitted a comment opposing Frankenfish, please go to!submitComment;D=FDA-2011-N-0899-0685. For the required field “Organization Name,” you can put “Citizen” and for the category, you can put “Individual Consumer.” Do it right now, it only takes a few minutes!

Feb 01 2013

SCS Recommends: Sitka STOP GMO SALMON Rally

The event will take place on  Saturday, February 9th, from 1:00 to 1:30 pm, at the Crescent Harbor Shelter.

This a quick get together to show public opposition to the pending FDA approval. It’s not too late to comment to the FDA, come learn why and how!

I’m inviting the press, so we really want a great showing.FRANKENFISH are a danger to our wild stocks,and to the marketplace.

Find out more about this issue by clicking the link below


Jan 08 2013

Senator Begich Works to Protect Salmon and Fights GMO Salmon

The Sitka Conservation Society applauds the efforts of Senator Mark Begich to stop the Food and Drug Administration from allowing genetically modified salmon to be produced and sold to consumers.  Senator Begich has called out the FDA for its recent finding that genetically modified salmon will have  “no significant impact” on the environment or public health.

Like all Southeast Alaskans, Senator Begich understands very well the importance of salmon to our lives and livelihoods.  Senator Begich understands that Wild Salmon are critical to our economy, our way-of-life, and is a keystone component of Southeast Alaska’s terrestrial and marine environment.  Senator Begich has taken a stand to protect our Wild Alaska Salmon.

Thank you Senator Begich for protecting Salmon.

Senator Begich has asked his constituents to weigh in and tell the Food and Drug Administration that we don’t want Genetically Modified Salmon.   Please help him out by telling the FDA your feelings by following this link and following the “Comment Now” prompt:!documentDetail;D=FDA-2011-N-0899-0003

For an idea on how to comment, read SCS comments:  here

To read Senator Begich’s press release, click: here

To read an editorial on Genetically Modified Salmon by a former SCS employee, click: here

Dec 13 2012

Reducing Runoff & Saving Salmon: December’s Chemical Challenge


Sitka has brought a myriad of new experiences for me in the short amount of time I have been here. I’ve learned I can home make my own jam or fruit leather from berries. I can process my own deer and have meat. I can harvest mushrooms and use them for a meal. These things were never a part of my upbringing. If you saw a berry on a bush in Chicago, you probably only ate it if you were dared. I have the opportunity to interact with the Tongass in more ways than just hiking the trails. Home making my own products seems much easier now than ever before.

To build off the idea of making my own foods or products, the other JV’s and I have decided to try a chemical challenge for the month of December. There are too many harsh products with destructive properties in household items. We are spending one month exploring alternatives to these products. To help protect our streams and ocean from these harsh chemicals that will inevitably make it there after it’s sent down the drain, we will create our own environmentally friendly products.

We are making one new homemade product or cleaning supply each week. This will include things like counter disinfectant, shampoo, toilet bowl cleaner, and more. After some research, we have found some common threads in homemade cleaning supplies, such as baking soda and vinegar. We have started collecting these types of ingredients to create some new cleaning supplies. Each week we will build off the previous product so by the end of the four weeks we will be consistently using four new cleaning solutions. Our goal is produce less harmful runoff and less of a footprint on our environment.

Salmon is an integral part of our community and it is the underlying backbone of what sustains us here in Sitka. Fisherman, processors, and fish eaters all have an investment in the livelihood of salmon in Alaska. Approximately 48 million wild salmon are caught every year in the Tongass. In order to keep our salmon healthy and safe, it is crucial that we protect our waters. Salmon are obviously hurt by trash and litter in the waterways, but chemicals are also effecting them. This could be overlooked because at a glance a river would look healthy and safe, but chemicals leaving our homes through the pipes or trash are making there way to the water. The EPA considers runoff to be the largest threat to water quality in the country currently. Investing in environmentally friendly products will help not only salmon, but the whole Tongass ecosystem. Check back at the end of the month to hear all about our new products and to get recipes to do this yourself!

Dec 06 2012

Salmon Community

Salmon are the backbone of the economy and the way-of-life in Southeast Alaska.  Many of our regional leaders recognize the importance of salmon for Southeast Alaska and recently worked with the Sitka Conservation Society to articulate why Salmon are important and the efforts they are taking to protect and sustain our Wild Salmon Populations.  With support from the State of Alaska Sustainable Salmon Fund and Trout Unlimited Alaska, SCS helped to produce a series of “Targeted, effective, and culturally competent messages on the importance of wild salmon and salmon habitat will be created that are customized to appeal to specific Southeast Alaska communities.”

The work of the Sitka Conservation Society strives to find the common ground that we all have to the natural world that surrounds us.  We work to build upon this common ground to chart a course for policy, practices, and personal relationships that create an enduring culture of conservation values alongside natural resource management that provides for current and future generations.  In Alaska, we have in Salmon an opportunity to do things right.  We are proud when are leaders recognize and support this vision and take actions that manifest this support.  Listen to what they have to say:


Listen to: Senator Mark Begich

“We have an incredible salmon resource in Southeast Alaska.  Did you know that salmon provide a 1 Billion dollar industry that powers the local economy? And that catching, processing and selling salmon puts 1 in 10 Southeast Alaskans to work?  Salmon is big business throughout Southeast Alaska and symbolizes the richness and bounty of the Tongass National Forest.  Healthy and abundant salmon–something we can all be proud of!”


Listen to: Senator Lisa Murkowski

“Since I was a young girl growing up in Southeast the region has been sustained because of the diversity of our economy, and a key part of that diversity is our salmon which fuel a 1 Billion dollar commercial fishery annually.  Not to mention the sport fisheries’ economic contributions.  Catching, processing and selling salmon accounts for 10% of all regional jobs.  Everyone is lucky to live in a place that produces such bountiful fisheries.  Healthy and abundant salmon–something we can all be proud of!”


Listen to: Dale Kelly – Alaska Troller’s Association

“Did you ever think that an old log lying in the stream might be good for salmon?  Turns out it is!  A fallen tree creates pools and eddies where salmon like to lay eggs.  These areas are also nurseries for young salmon.  Back in the day, people used to clear logs from salmon streams, but that’s no longer allowed and restoration work is underway in some rivers.  Healthy forests mean healthy salmon–something we can all be proud of!”


Listen to: Bruce Wallace – United Fishermen of Alaska

“Did you know that conserving and restoring salmon habitat means jobs for Southeast Alaskans?  Salmon already employ about 1 in 10 people here.  Restoring salmon watersheds damaged in the past means more fish, bigger overall catches, and more jobs.  With support from the Alaska Sustainable Salmon Fund, forest restoration projects are underway in the Tongass National Forest.  Healthy forests mean healthy salmon–something we can all be proud of!


Listen to: Sencer Severson – Salmon Troller

“Southeast Alaskans love our rare spells of hot, dry weather, but heat and sunshine can be bad for salmon–in fact, they like shade.  That’s why our towering trees in the Tongass National Forest are so important for our salmon to reproduce.  Leaving trees along salmon streams provides essential shade.  It also prevents erosion and keeps rivers in their natural channels.  In the Tongass, healthy forests mean healthy salmon!”


Listen to: Cora Campbell – Commissioner of the Alaska Dept. of Fish and Game

“Alaska’s sustainable salmon management depends on good information.  That’s why technicians may ask to look at salmon you’ve caught.  Fish with the adipose fin removed usually means the salmon had a tiny wire ta implanted in side when they were juveniles.  These tags provide managers with important information on the origin of the stock.  Healthy and abundant salmon–something we can all be proud of!”


Dec 05 2012

Take Action: Tell the Forest Service to follow through

Background: The US Forest Service has adopted the Tongass Transition Framework, a program intended to shift forest management away from the out-dated and ill-fated old growth logging paradigm toward management that support multiple uses of the forest, including recreation, restoration, subsistence, and second-growth management.  This is an encouraging recognition of the region’s important natural resources, but the figures don’t match the Forest Service’s transition plan.  Check out the figures here.

For example, the Forest Service still spends over $22 million a year on logging and road building, but only $6 million on recreation and tourism and $8 million on restoration and watershed.  Our fishing industry relies on healthy watersheds and restoring damaged salmon stream.  Our tourism industry relies on recreational facilities and wildplaces for visitors to get the Alaska experience.  It just so happens that these are also the two biggest industries in Southeast, together supporting over 15,000 jobs and providing just under $2 BILLION to the local economy.  Logging on the other hand only supports 200 jobs.

Take Action: Please ask the Forest Service to follow through with their Transition Framework and put their money where their mouth is.  Write to the Undersecretary of Natural Resources, Harris Sherman.


Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
1400 Independence Ave. S.W.
Washington, D.C.

Please also send a copy to SCS at so we can hand-deliver all of your letters to the Undersecretary himself in Washington, DC.

Some key point to include in your letter:

  • Tourism and fishing are the two largest economic drivers in Southeast Alaska.
  • Logging and road building cost tax payers $22.1M annually, while the Forest Service only spends $6.1 M annually on tourism and $8.1M annually on fisheries and watershed management.  BUT, the timber industry only supports 200 jobs— tourism supports 10,200 and fishing supports 7,200.
  • The Forest Service has adopted the Tongass Transition Framework, a program to transition from timber harvesting in roadless areas and old-growth forests to long-term stewardship contracts and young growth management.  This is an encouraging recognition of the need to protect the region’s natural resources and fundamental economic drivers: tourism and fishing, BUT the Forest Service needs to reflect this transition in their budget.
  • Be sure to include your personal connection to the Tongass, it’s forests and natural resources.
  • Also, be sure to include how you rely on the Tongass—for subsistence, recreation, business, etc.

Example: Here’s an example letter I wrote.  Feel free to use this as a template:

Your Address Here
Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
1400 Independence Ave. S.W.
Washington, D.C.
Dear Chief Tidwell:
I am writing out of concern for my home.  I live in Sitka, Alaska, a small fishing community in Southeast Alaska surrounded by the Tongass National Forest.  Our entire economy revolves around our natural resources.  I have been a guide for many years with a sea kayak tourism company.  When my clients, or really anyone, come up to see Alaska they want to see three things: bears, forests, and salmon.  Luckily for me as a guide, if you find one of them, you’ll find the others.  For instance, if you find a salmon stream, you’d better be on the look-out for a bear; if you want to find a good salmon stream, go to the healthiest, oldest forest; and if you want to find a stand of big healthy trees, follow the salmon and bears.
Just as the bears, salmon, and tress are connected, so too are our industries: tourism, fishing, and timber.  In Sitka, we’ve already seen that poor logging practices kill our fishing industry by destroying the spawning-streams, the birthplaces of our salmon populations.  Without standing forests and salmon fishing, tourism wanes in response. 
Recently, though, we have also seen that if all of these industries are balanced, our communities benefit as a whole.  Small-scale logging, responsible fishing, and eco-friendly tourism have been growing at increasing rates and are the model for a new future for the Tongass.  In Southeast, we are trying to build a sustainable future, and we are succeeding.
My concern for my home stems from your agency’s spending priorities.  Like any healthy and productive systems, our economy and your budget need to be proportionate and well-balanced.  So, why does your agency spend just $6.1 million on recreation and tourism and $8.1 million on fisheries, but about $25 million annually on timber and road-building?  That is certainly not a balance, and considering that fishing is our largest industry and tourism is the second in line, it is nowhere near proportionate.
As the Forest Service, you say that your job is “caring for the land and serving people.”  To care for the land and serve people in Southeast (and anyone who values these wild places) please redistribute your budget priorities to reflect the real situation on the Tongass.  Imagine if we invested $25 million in salmon habitat restoration and recreation instead of timber.  In four years, we will have completed all of the restoration projects needed on the Tongass.  Compare that to the 50 years it will take at current rates.  Speaking for all of us in Southeast Alaska, we cannot wait 50 years.
Thank you for your consideration.
Adam Andis

Nov 21 2012

The Sitka Conservation Society’s Wild Foods Potluck 2012

Join us at the SCS Annual Wild Foods Potluck

November 29th, 5:00-7:30 pm at Harrigan Centennial Hall

This free, community event gives everyone a chance to come together and share meals made with locally foraged food, from fish and wild game to seaweed, berries and other traditional subsistence foods. All folks are asked to bring in dishes that feature local wild foods, and if you can’t bring in a dish that features wild foods you can use a wild plant to garnish a dish made with store-bought foods. Doors open at 5 p.m. to bring in your dish, with dinner starting at 6:00 p.m. Non-alcoholic drinks will be provided.

This year’s theme will beRestoration in the Sitka Community Use Area where we will be sharing with you the hard work we’ve put in to the Tongass National Forest. There will be prizes awarded for the best dishes made in categories like:

-best entree/most wild

-best side

-best dessert

-most creative/artistic

-most filling (we have a lot of folks come to the Wild Foods potluck, so if you cook a big dish that can feed a lot of people, that would be very mindful and considerate and definitely worth rewarding!)

The doors open at 5:00 pm so you’ll have a chance to visit the community booths from the following groups:

  • Sitka Local Foods Network
  • Sitka Trailworks
  • Sitka Maritime Heritage Society
  • Alaska Longline Fishermen’s Association
  • Alaska Way of Life 4-H Club
  • Forest Service
  • Sitka Cooperative Extension Service
  • SCS Fish to Schools
  • Wood Utilization Center


Look through photos of past years for inspiration, or view an article on the stories behind the dishes that were entered in the 2011 potluck.





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Keep up to date on all of the issues. Check out "The Southeaster" Blog.

  • Hungry for Huckleberry Pie, Venison Stew, or Fresh Greens? Come to the Wild Foods Potluck Nov. 2!
  • Stand Up to Corporate Influence!
  • Kayaking Kootznoowoo: Report on SCS’s Final Wilderness Trip
  • Encouraging Local Natural Resource Stewardship on the Tongass: Kennel Creek
  • Teaching the Alaska way of Life: 4-H in Sitka
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