Sitka Conservation Society
Jul 22 2014

Got a favorite fish recipe? Enter the Fish to Schools Recipe Contest!

Do you have a favorite fish recipe? Does your kid? Come share them with us!

A Fish to Schools lunch at Mt. Edgecumbe High School.

The Sitka Conservation Society is teaming up with the Sitka Seafood Festival to offer the first annual Fish to Schools Recipe Contest. The contest will take place on Saturday, August 2 at 4:30 p.m at the Main Tent on the Sheldon Jackson Campus.
Want to learn more about the contest? Here’s the basics:
The purpose of the contest is to collect kid-friendly, healthy fish recipes that can be used in local school lunches. Kids can be picky eaters, so if you have a kid-approved fish recipe, this is your time to shine! Winning recipes will be passed on to school district officials and will hopefully appear on school lunch trays in the fall. Prizes, including a Ludvig’s gift certificate, will also be distributed.
Interested? Here’s what you need to do to enter the contest:
1. Come up with a fish recipe that is both kid-friendly and healthy. To ensure that all entrees are nutritious and delicious, please stick to these basic guidelines:
  • Keep it low in fat and sodium
  • Bake the fish!
  • Don’t use any special appliances. These recipes will be replicated in local schools in big quantities, so don’t make it too complicated.
2. Prepare a few servings of your dish (enough for 15 people to nibble) and bring it to the Sitka Seafood Festival on Saturday, August 2. Dishes should be dropped off at 4:15 p.m. at the Main Tent on the SJ Campus.
3. Include a recipe with your dish and (if possible) a photo of you preparing it.
4. Sit back and relax…and wait for the judges to cast their ballots!
For more information and to register for the contest, please contact Sophie at

SCS Board Member Spencer Severson shares a meal with a student at Keet Gooshi Heen Elementary School.

Coho with beach asparagus, served at a Fish to Schools lunch at Pacific High School.




Jul 18 2014

Why do salmon jump? Exploring the Medvejie Hatchery in Southeast Alaska

Fishing season is in full swing here in Southeast Alaska.  The docks of Sitka are buzzing with fishermen anxiously awaiting every available opener to go out and get the next big catch!
Here in Southeast Alaska, fish are a part of every day life.  One in 10 jobs in Sitka is directly related to the fishing industry.  But, salmon is important for subsistence and recreation in the Tongass National Forest as well.  The Tongass produces 28 percent of Alaskan salmon.  Salmon hatcheries play an important role in mitigating disease among salmon and ensuring salmon populations can meet the economic and cultural demands of the region.
The Medvejie hatchery in Southeast Alaska is a short boat ride away from Sitka and it produces chum, Chinook (King) and coho salmon, by the millions.

Baby cohos are kept in tanks until they are released in fresh water streams in the Tongass.

Hatcheries support wild populations of salmon, they do not replace them.  Housing salmon for just their early months, the fish are released into fresh water streams that lead straight to the ocean. The ones that survive the fishing season, return home to the hatchery to spawn (lay eggs) and then die.  Salmon traditionally return to the stream they were born to spawn.
The stream at the Medvejie hatchery is fondly referred to by workers as the “Spawnoma Canal.”  After the salmon come up, hatchery workers release eggs and sperm into a bag to fertilize them and then they preserve the meat to be sent to fish processing plants.  Outside of hatcheries, the dead fish are eaten by bears and eagles and their carcasses help fertilize the surrounding soil.
Medvejie, like all hatcheries, has a way of marking all of their fish so they can keep track of how many make it back to the hatchery and how many are caught in the wild. By changing the temperatures of the boxes where eggs are kept, a barcode is created on every fish’s eardrum. They also tag each fish with a number (usually on its face).

More baby cohos being shown to tourists at the hatchery.

So, why do they jump? Well, no one really knows.  Some say jumping helps loosen the eggs before it’s time to spawn.  Some research shows that salmon jump in response to pressure and stress.  Others just believe the fish are having fun. You know, the #yolo mentality! There are a lot of theories and explanations floating around, but no salmon has ever answered the question for us, so we may never know for sure.

Sitka Conservation Society employees feel the baby salmon nipping at their fingers inside the Medvejie hatchery.

Jul 15 2014

Building a local food movement from the front yard

When Southeast Alaskans think of local food, we usually think of foraging, fishing and hunting. In the realm of produce, however, we have become accustomed to eating fruits and vegetables shipped in from the lower 48 and around the globe.  But a gardening movement is on the rise around the islands. In Sitka, a city with no agricultural property, people have been working with the city to create ways to grow and sell local produce. Like all southeast towns, Sitka has a small and strong community, which makes negotiating with local lawmakers to change the structure of land and food policy more direct and personal. With the farmer’s markets gaining steam and gardens springing up all over town, the future of the local food movement in Sitka is bright. But it has taken many pioneers to get it on its feet.

Lori Adams says, “She couldn’t do any of this without the ducks.” Her feathered friends help her control the slug population.

One of those leaders is Lori Adams, owner and operator of Down-to-Earth You-Pick garden. She was raised on a farm in Oregon and moved to Sitka to fish with her husband in the 80s. With no dirt to play in, living on a fishing boat was a rough adjustment. Once she and her husband bought property of their own, however, Lori began scheming up plans to get back to veggie production. “I just have farming in my roots and dirt under my fingernails,” she told me, “and it won’t go away. And I always wanted to farm, and we moved up here and I just decided that I would farm where I went.”

The view from Sawmill Creek Road of Lori’s epic front yard

Lori wanted to create her own You-Pick garden where she could sell her produce to customers who came to her house to harvest it directly from her front yard. “Where I grew up a You-Pick garden was a common thing,” she explained, “… So, I feel like it’s really important to grow my own food and teach other people how to grow their own food. And many of the children who grow up here have never seen a carrot in the ground, have never picked a pea off the vine, and so they just don’t have a connection like that with their food.” With a You-Pick garden, she could satisfy her farming itch, while also giving Sitkans the opportunity to learn about gardening and create a more intimate relationship with how their food is grown.

Immediately she called the planning department to ask for a permit to start a You-Pick garden. “They looked at me with a blank look and said, ‘You want to do what?’” As the law stood in 2007, it was illegal to sell produce directly off of private property and to allow people to harvest their own vegetables. Luckily, the people at the planning department were willing and excited to work with Lori. They thought it was such a good idea that they wanted to help her make it legal. “So we spent 6 months changing the zoning laws and going to the assembly meetings, and once it was worked out it turned out that anyone in Sitka could have a you-pick garden if they applied for a special use permit.” Now, any one in Sitka who applies for a special use permit can start a You-Pick garden right on their property.

Today, Lori has a whole community of return customers. They love coming up to her property, picking her brain about gardening, greeting the ducks, and harvesting their own kohlrabi, kale, leeks, onions, sorrel, lettuce and other cold-weather-loving vegetables.  But Lori is just as excited to sell her produce as she is to teach others how to garden, or even how to create their own You-Pick. “That’s my hope,” she told me, “that they’ll sprout up all over and it will just become a common thing.”

Whether or not her story inspires others to create a You-Pick, her collaboration with the planning department is certainly a testament to the responsiveness of Sitka’s local government to new ideas addressing issues of local food. Property may be expensive and limited, but there is plenty of room for innovation, and stories like Lori’s certainly aren’t in short supply! Go to to hear more stories or to share a story about building sustainable communities in Southeast. You can also learn more about Lori on her blog. If you are interested in getting involved in the local food movement, visit the Sitka local food network’s website.

Jul 02 2014

Sitka Kitch Community Classes

Sitka Kitch will be kicking off some classes this month. From July 25-27th Sitka Kitch welcomes Sarah Lewis from UAF Cooperative extension. Sarah is the  Family & Community Development Faculty for the Southeast Districts. Beginning Friday evening, Sarah will lead a ‘Cottage Food Industry’ class. This class is geared towards those wishing to produce value added products for the cottage food industry. Saturday, July 26th Sarah will be at the Sitka Farmer’s Market assisting vendors and answering questions. Starting at 3:00pm Sarah will lead a ‘canning the harvest’ course, focusing on canning and preserving fish and veggies. The weekend will wrap up Sunday with a ‘Soups and Sauces’ workshop beginning at noon.

Classes will be held at Sitka High School and run several hours.

  • Friday, 5:30-8:00pm
  • Saturday, 3:00-8:00pm
  • Sunday, 12:00-5:00pm

Classes cost $20.00 each and space is limited. Students are asked to bring 8-12 half pint jars for the Cottage Food Industry course and 12 half pint jars for the other classes. All food and supplies will be provided and students will take home what they prepare.

Sitka Kitch will be partnering with Sitka Tribe of Alaska to offer a pickled salmon course on in August.This class is offered free of charge, but space is extremely limited. More details on date and location will be available soon.

To register for any course please contact Marjorie or Tracy at 747-7509.

Sitka Kitch is a new community food project in Sitka. We seek to provide community education, training, small business development and access to commercial kitchen space with the end goal of improving our local food security. This is the first series of classes to increase community knowledge and awareness around nutrition and local foods.



Jun 30 2014

Fish to Southeast

It’s amazing to see how far Fish to Schools has spread. Sitka wasn’t the first community to serve local fish in schools , but we put the program on the map. By telling our story, advocating for policy change, and sharing resources we’ve been able to support Fish to Schools efforts across the state. And it’s happening! Alaskan fish is now served in nearly every school district in Alaska.

I just finished up a few visits to four Southeast Communities: Kake, Hoonah, Hydaburg, and Kasaan. I was working with the Sustainable Southeast Partnership to check out what’s happening in each community and connect them to resources to strengthen their programs.

I started in Kasaan on Prince of Whales Island (POW). It’s a tiny village of about 60 people with a traditional schoolhouse and 10 kids. They started serving Alaskan fish in 2013 but it comes from the Anchorage area. Kasaan is surrounded by water and subsistence is a way-of-life—finding local fish isn’t the problem. But as it stands only commercial fish can enter a school meal program, so we’re looking at how we can circumnavigate that and support the fishermen who live on POW.

Next was Hydaburg, a village of about 400 people and 50 students. They have a similar story, Alaskan fish is offered but it comes from up north. They have commercial fishermen but the closest place they can deliver is in Craig. There are a few logistical challenges to get local fish in Hydaburg schools, but the interest is there to make it possible.

Then I was in Kake, with about 550 people and 110 students. They have been serving fish from Wasilla but have a local seafood processor in town. The processor up north portions and packages fish in a way that makes it easy for the school—but it doesn’t support the local fishermen or processor right in town. It’s convenient yes, and that’s important; schools just don’t have enough staff in the kitchen to cook foods from scratch. While the local seafood processor can’t match the level of processing they are currently used to, they are willing to do some minimal, custom processing for the school so Kake can serve Kake fish next year!

I finished my round of visits in Hoonah, where a strong program already exists. This town of about 750 residents and 100 students, has seen local halibut in schools since 2012. They serve salmon as well but also source it from up north. They are willing to give local salmon a shot next year and hope the pin bones won’t be a big (time) issue.

All four districts I visited have been purchasing local seafood through the Nutritional Alaskan Foods for Schools grant. It’s created an incentive to purchase local and also offsets the high food costs for small, remote communities. Kasaan, Hydaburg, and Kake all specifically spoke to the economic importance of purchasing locally for their communities.

Every district also seemed open, even enthusiastic, to the Stream to Plate curriculum. Principals and superintendents were excited to pass it along to a few of their teachers, who could implement and adapt the lessons to their classroom and community. Teaching students the backstory to the fish on their plate will empower them to make food choices that extend beyond taste. These children are our future fishermen, seafood processors, entrepreneurs, resource managers, and consumers of Alaskan seafood.

All in all, the response was positive and I’m excited to see what happens. Each community has an active community catalyst through the Sustainable Southeast Partnership to follow through on Fish to Schools goals. I’m here on standby as they make small and significant changes.

Jun 23 2014

Subsistence in Wilderness

The day we headed out from Hoonah was like most days in Southeast Alaska. Grey clouds diffused the light and an almost imperceptible rain left everything damp.  We were headed to the Inian Islands, a cluster of knobby isles on the western end of Icy Strait, just inside the entrance to Cross Sound.  Our trip held a dual mission: to conduct volunteer wilderness monitoring for the Forest Service and to gather traditional subsistence foods for the Hoonah locals on the trip: Owen James and Gordon Greenwald, our boat captains and wizened culture-bearers, two young men named Randy and Sam, and another adult volunteer, Kathy McCrobie.

The Inians along with two other large islands make up the Pleasant/Lemesurier/Inian Island Wilderness.  The PLI Wilderness is one of 19 areas within the Tongass National Forest designated as Wilderness, the highest form of protection public lands can receive. The islands are also historic gathering and hunting grounds of the Huna Tlingit, the native tribe who call this section of northern Southeast Alaska home.  Because the Inians are close to the open sea, they are rich with unique flora and fauna. A trip to these distant islands is an opportunity to collect delicacies not common in interior waters near Hoonah.  For instance, one of our subsistence targets was black seaweed, a species that thrives in the cold, wave washed intertidal zone of the outercoast, but is rarely found more than a few miles into the Southeast archipelago.

The Inian Islands are the perfect spot to collect black seaweed, a species that thrives in the cold, wave washed intertidal zone of the outercoast, but is rarely found more than a few miles into the Southeast archipelago.

The two students on the trip, Randy and Sam, collect seaweed which will be dried once they return to Hoonah.

It is easy to see why the Inian Islands have become a prime destination for recreation and tourism, as well as subsistence.


The outside waters can be a harsh place in the summer and downright inhospitable in the winter.  Although the Huna Tlingit are seasoned open ocean travelers and motorized skiffs make the 40-mile journey from the village of Hoonah to the islands much more manageable than a Tlingit canoe, it is still a sizable trip for locals. The same factors—difficult access and a short season—also make it difficult for the Forest Service Wilderness Rangers who are headquartered in Hoonah, to access these areas that they are tasked with managing and protecting.

On the first day of our trip we arrived at the Inian Islands after a few hours of skiffing over unusually calm waters.  Our first stop was at lowtide on a rocky beach, the perfect habitat for Black Katy chitons, one of the traditional foods commonly called Gumboots which we hoped to return with.

Black Katy chiton (Katharina tunicata) is a traditional food, commonly called Gumboots.

Owen instructs the students on the art of Gumboot hunting.

After the Gumboots have been collected, they are typically canned for preservation and storage.

Gumboots live in the intertidal zone, and are particularly susceptible to contamination from development and timber harvest. Wilderness designation ensures that these fragile ecosystems and the subsistence foods within will be protected in perpetuity.

The beach also looked like it could be a prime camping area, so while the rest of the crew flipped rocks and pried unsuspecting chitons from their hiding spots, I headed up the beach to look for recreational impacts.  Monitoring impacts from visitors is one of the tasks the Forest Service has asked us to assist with.  Wilderness areas are intended to preserve nature in its wildest state, but trash, campfire rings, and other signs of previous visitors detract from the wild character of these places.  Also, once a site has been impacted, the trend is a downward slope to a trashed site.  To prevent cumulative impact, we check known campsites and cleanup and naturalize any human traces we find.  Fortunately, this site was in the same condition it’s probably been in since it was uncovered by the glacier, so I spent some time flipping rocks and adding to the gumboots collection.
As the tide neared its apex, Gordon pointed out a small rock island set apart from the larger Inian Islands.  For generations, this rock had been the prize destination for Huna families.  Set far from land and too small to support trees, the rock is the perfect nesting ground for seabirds like gulls and cormorants and we had timed our trip perfectly to harvest the new eggs.  As we approached the rock in skiffs, Gordon and Owen explained the protocol: as the swell surges, we run the skiff up to the rock, one person jumps off, and he pulls the bow away before the swell drops the boat onto the shore, then reset and try again for the next person.  Before they maneuvered the skiffs toward the rock, they carefully taught the boys the traditional method to appropriately harvest the eggs. If done in an ecologically responsible way, these practices will be able to continue forever.  (Learn more about the regulation regarding egg collection by Alaskan Natives).

For generations, this small rock island within the Inian Islands has been a prize destination for Huna families seeking sea gull eggs.

As we approached the rock in skiffs, Gordon and Owen explained the protocol: as the swell surges, we run the skiff up to the rock, one person jumps off, and he pulls the bow away before the swell drops the boat onto the shore, then reset and try again for the next person.  Once on the rocks, Gordon instructed Sam and Randy to only take eggs from nests with multiple eggs, always leaving one behind.

“As we approached the rock in skiffs, Gordon and Owen explained the protocol: as the swell surges, we run the skiff up to the rock, one person jumps off, and he pulls the bow away before the swell drops the boat onto the shore, then reset and try again for the next person.”

Sam was the first to make the jump.  The birds immediately erupted in a cacophony of squawks and feathers. Randy and I traded apprehensive glances.  I made an excuse that I needed to pack my camera gear in drybags before I could jump…really I just wanted one more chance to see how it was done.  Randy landed an impressive leap, despite receiving a bootfull of water.  I followed him up the rock.  As a non-Native, without subsistence rights to the eggs, my job was to enjoy the view.  Blankets of birds flapped above us.  The few green tufts of grass made a stark contrast to the guano-bleached stone and the blue-grey sky and water.  It took no time for Sam and Randy to collect plenty of eggs to share with family and elders back in Hoonah.  With concentration, steady boat handling, and good timing, we all made it safely back aboard the skiffs.

“Blankets of birds flapped above us. The few green tufts of grass made a stark contrast to the guano-bleached stone and the blue-grey sky and water. It took no time for Sam and Randy to collect plenty of eggs to share with family and elders back in Hoonah.”

“I was impressed with the way Owen and Gordon pointed out new landmarks to the two young men. Every remark about a headland or bay included not only geographical references, but also historical, cultural, and subsistence context.”

As the day went on, I was impressed with the way Owen and Gordon pointed out new landmarks to the two young men.  Every remark about a headland or bay included not only geographical references, but also historical, cultural, and subsistence context.

That night, while we ate chowder made with local salmon, smoked octopus and cockles, I reflected on the education Randy and Sam had inherited on this trip.  I have no doubt that they were more interested in learning about hunting spots, edible shellfish, and traditional stories than they were about the Wilderness land designation of their home.  But, I would like to think that by relating the cultural values and subsistence practices of the Inian Islands along with the Wilderness values that will continue to protect this place for those practices, they have a better chance of retaining a favorable perspective of public lands, too.

In the end, the idea and values of Wilderness are stories, stories that must be repeated and retold to maintain their relevance.  Gordon and Owen have endeavored to pass those stories to Hoonah youth.  My esteem and thanks goes out to them for including the value of respect for public lands in the stories they tell.

Jun 18 2014

What’s Cooking Sitka?

Sitka Kitch is the recent community food project that arose from the 2013 Sitka Health Summit. SCS is spearheading this effort along with a committee of dedicated volunteers.  The overall goal of Sitka Kitch is to improve health, provide a new community resource and promote community development; all through the lens of food security. SCS has a history of success when it comes to promoting local food and we hope that Sitka Kitch will be no different. There are numerous opportunities for Sitka Kitch to continue to foster programs like Fish 2 Schools, partner with local food organizations, all through a shared use community kitchen.

What community kitchens bring to the table!

The Sitka Kitch will start with food based education and emergency preparedness at the household level. In fact we will be offering several classes in July on how to can and prepare food for your pantry. As it grows, the Kitch seeks to provide career and technical training, and entrepreneurial development opportunities.  This will be achieved through a shared use community kitchen. We have partnered with the First Presbyterian Church  to provide space on a limited basis.  SCS and the church collaborated in April to prepare an application to the “Northwest Coast Presbytery community blessings grant.”  The proposal outlined a budget to renovate their existing kitchen to meet the requirements of becoming a DEC certified Kitchen and thus meet the needs of potential Sitka Kitch users. The application was successful and we were awarded $13,000 for the project! The renovations will be underway this summer with a goal of offering commercial space to users in the late summer or early fall.

For more information on classes or being a new tenant contact Marjorie at SCS ( or 747-7509).


Jun 17 2014

Celebrating Fish to Schools in 2013-2014

In 2010 local fish was absent from the school lunch menu–now, less than four years later local fish is offered at every school in Sitka. It all started at Blatchley Middle School and along the way Keet Gooshi Heen, Pacific High, Mount Edgecumbe High, Sitka High, and SEER Schools joined the ranks. With a hugely successful trial lunch at Baranof Elementary, they have agreed to participate regularly next school year. Each year we take steps towards a sustainable Fish to Schools program.

I love this program for so many reasons. I love how it brings the community together–fishermen in the schools, parents joining students for lunch, local fish supporting local processors, testimonials on the radio. And I love that it’s taken the whole community to make it successful–schools investing in the idea, food service preparing meals from scratch, teachers opening up their classrooms, parents encouraging their children to choose fish for lunch, students eating fish, and local citizens taking a stand politically by advocating for state support through letters and testimonials.

Nothing makes me happier than hearing stories of children trying fish for the first time through Fish to Schools and loving it. Or students who used to hate fish, now eating it at home prepared just like Chef Colette made it in the classroom. Or the stories of children pointing out different fishing boats on the water that they learned in Stream to Plate.

Fish to Schools is a program that brings together community around food–a food that is so culturally, traditionally, and economically important to Sitka. If we can teach children that salmon require respect–respect in their harvest and habitat–we will continue to have a thriving fishery that supports subsistence, recreation, and commercial needs for..ever. We hope this program lays the groundwork on how fishing works and inspire children either support or become involved in the industry. We’ve had a few successes in the 2013-2014 school year. Here’s a snapshot we want to celebrate with you.

  • Baranof Elementary School joins the ranks!
  • Our story has been featured in a number of Alaska and national media outlets including National Fisherman Magazine (check out the Northern Lights column and follow-up story currently going to print) and Chewing the Fat, a WBEZ radio podcast in Chicago. We’re featured in the same radio hour as Chez Panisse Chef Alice Waters and Renegade Lunch Lady Ann Cooper. I would encourage you to listen to the whole program but if you want to hear just the Fish to Schools bit scroll to 35:25.
  • We also had the opportunity and privilege to speak at the National Farm to Cafeteria Conference this spring on a “protein” panel. Many schools around the country are comfortably integrating local fruits and veggies into their school lunch program but proteins are a different beast. This panel focused on seafood, beef, chicken, pork, and legumes as viable protein sources for schools. The conversation is expanding and constantly changing!
  • We’re thrilled to announce that our advocacy efforts this last legislative session paid off! Nutritional Alaskan Foods for Schools was funded for the third year in a row, which means more funding for schools to purchase Alaskan foods. It’s a win for the schools to purchase healthy, local foods while at the same time providing a stable market for local businesses. It’s also stretching schools to prepare more meals from scratch because most of the Alaskan foods currently on the market are raw: seafood, livestock, and vegetables. Nearly every district in the state is using this funding to purchase Alaskan seafood!
  • And finally, we’ve been contracted by the Sustainable Southeast Partnership to support Fish to Schools efforts in four Southeast Communities: Hydaburg, Kasaan, Kake, and Hoonah. We have been welcomed in each community and have had great conversations about how to get local fish into the schools. More details on this soon!
May 23 2014

Fish Need Trees, Too

SCS Board Member, Brendan Jones recently published an article in the New Your Times: “Fish Need Trees, too.” detailing the Forest Service’s poor management of resources in Southeast Alaska,  putting giant, ecologically destructive clear-cuts over protecting habitat for salmon–the backbone of the Southeat Alaskan economy.

Brendan writes:

This year, though, the fishing fleet in southeast Alaska will work under the shadow of an announcement by the United States Forest Service that it intends to approve the Big Thorne timber sale, which would allow the logging industry to harvest about 6,200 acres of remnant old-growth trees in Tongass National Forest, the world’s largest remaining temperate rain forest. It would be the most destructive old-growth cut in the forest in the past 20 years.

You can help.

Sign the Petition below: Tell Alaska’s senators to put pressure on the Forest Service to prioritize our salmon and stop support out-dated logging projects.

Write a Letter: Ask the Forest Service and Senators to make better decisions about our public lands and start judging success by counting the number of jobs and economic gains of salmon production rather than the number of board feet.

Donate: We are a small organization fighting to protect a very large forest.  We rely on our members and supporters.

Remind the Forest Service that Fish Need Trees, too!



Share this with your friends:


Your message will be delivered to Senators Begich and Muskowski, Undersecretary Robert Bonnie, Chief of the Forest Service Tm Tidwell, and Regional Forester Beth Pendleton.

May 22 2014

i’m gonna tell you about some salmon

In an effort to build community around Fish to Schools we’ve invited you to give a testimonial about the program. We’ve heard from the generous fishermen who donate to the program, to parents, to teachers, and students. The beauty in working with the schools is that everyone can be involved. Regardless of income, students can order the finest quality fish in the world, caught right here in the Sitka Sound. It’s environmentally and economically responsible. And it tastes really good.

This is the latest Fish to Schools promo we produced through KCAW, Raven Radio. I hope it puts a smile on your face. Alexandra was a wonderful interview, enjoy.

Click the link to listen: Alexandra PSA


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  • Hungry for Huckleberry Pie, Venison Stew, or Fresh Greens? Come to the Wild Foods Potluck Nov. 2!
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